By on July 2, 2019

Hyundai’s luxury Genesis brand is set to launch a new global electric vehicle architecture in 2021. Both a sedan and SUV are said to be in the works, positioning the Korean models to go head-to-head with Tesla Motors. These would be the first electric vehicles created under the Genesis moniker and are just a part of their growing commitment to developing alternative-propulsion vehicles.

Genesis Brand Head Manfred Fitzgerald, while launching the Genesis brand in Australia, told Drive.au, “We are absolutely committed to alternative propulsion. I think you will see that Genesis will have every alternative covered in a relatively short space of time.” Indicating that a selection of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, pure electric, and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are coming, he said, “In 2021 we have our first fully dedicated new EV platform… We are moving very fast on this.”

While no confirmation is provided regarding when the fuel cell vehicle would be launched, a pure EV is a short two years away. Hyundai has been on a roll in the United States and abroad, so there is little doubt that they will be a contender in the EV space, especially when competing with the ever-improving Genesis brand image.

[Images: Hyundai]

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21 Comments on “Genesis Working on ‘Tesla-Fighting’ Electric Sedan, SUV for 2021...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    While I love Hyundai’s execution on my Ioniq EV, H/K/G has not yet shown themselves to be serious about competing in the EV market.

    First, they need to source a *lot* of batteries.

    Second, they need to do more than just sell in CARB-observing states.

    Third, the need to sell lots of range, especially in an SUV. They have a good competitive start in the Niro EV and Kona EV, but their volume is so low as to not even matter in the market.

    And to compete with Tesla, it has to perform well, look good, be widely available, and enjoy great dealer support. I’m not so sure H/K/G can do all of this. Frankly, most Genesis dealers would rather sell a G80 than a low-margin EV which never returns for maintenance, and which becomes a boat anchor in the used car lot after the lease is up.

    To compete with the Model X, don’t use falcon doors and you’ll be off to a good start.

    Good luck to them.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      my semi-wild a___ guess: H-K’s lack of electric offering is due to Korea’s progressive(ly increasing) electricity rates (for commercial/industrial and residential).

      And no available overnight discount rates (if i recall correctly)

      I don’t remember the exact rates but once you hit the top tier, no monetary point in buying an EV for Koreans.

      too bad as South Korea’s compact size would make range anxiety largely moot even for “cross-country” road trips.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I doubt that electric rates have much to do with it.

        It would be a mistake to buy an EV just to save money on gas.

        Hyundai’s lack of EVs is due to the fact that they’re not profitable unless you go all in, and even that has yet to be proven. Tesla is struggling to become profitable while dominating the EV market, so just imagine the losses if you only build a few thousand EVs per year.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Actually, the Ioniq and Niro EVs have sold well in Korea, but like elsewhere, limited supply.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      1. There is a lack of battery production capacity overall.

      2. W/ limited production/availability due to the shortage of batteries, other markets (like the EU) get priority (and they still have a shortage of supply).

      3. Range will only improve (from the Niro, Kona and Soul EVs) as battery tech improves.

      4. Considering that the BEV powertrain in the Kona (and Niro and Soul) made Ward’s 2019 Top 10 Best Propulsion Systems list, think performance/range will be fine (esp. since on the performance end, will incorporate some stuff from Rimac, as Hyundai is an investor).

      5. In terms of looking-good, based on the spy shots of the GV80 and GV70 (as well as the Essentia concept), shouldn’t be an issue. esp. as the “humpback” Model X is no looker.

      6. Notwithstanding the current status of Genesis dealerships, dealer support will be better than what Tesla can offer, much less support for repair-work.

      7. On top of that, the Genesis BEV will have a more luxurious interior and better fit and finish.

      All that being said, will a Genesis BEV (likely to be a Model Y and not a Model X competitor) sell as well as the Tesla?

      No.

      Tesla has too much of a head-start in establishing its credentials as the go-to lux BEV automaker and will likely have a good bit more production capacity.

      Still, that doesn’t mean a Genesis BEV CUV can’t be a success in a more limited basis (rather limited supply, but the Taycan is sold out for its 1st yr model run).

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Well, I don’t see any Tesla fan buying anything with a Genesis brand on it.

    They’re going to have to up the content, bargain basement the price and make sure that fit/finish/quality is absolutely stellar.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      They said compete with Tesla. As such I’m not sure anything beyond GM X body fit and finish is required. In short, crank the Excel line back up.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      FWIW, I cross-shopped the Model 3, Bolt, Leaf, and Ioniq EV, and chose the Hyundai.

      Granted, Genesis and the Model X are at a higher level than my budget, but being a fan of Tesla doesn’t necessarily mean signing for one. For instance, I really like the Model X, but those falcon doors are too troublesome and impractical for me to actually buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Not difficult to surpass Tesla when it comes to interior appointment, much less fit and finish.

      Based on spy shots of the new G80 and GV80, the interiors look very nice.

      Tesla has built up its reputation as the leader in luxury BEVs, so it’s not like Genesis (or the Germans) will topple the brand that has developed an Apple-like cult following any time soon.

      At the same time, Tesla has also developed a reputation for less than luxurious interiors, fit and finish issues and making repairs more difficult and costly than what is necessary.

      There are a good # of prospective buyers interested in BEVs, but leery of Tesla due to the aforementioned.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Hyundai has really botched the rollout of Genesis. Between the confusion of having dedicated dealers or not, launching sedans first, and the crossovers seemingly perpetually 2 years away, I’m not putting much stock in their EV plans.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed. The Hyundai/Genesis dealer I got my Ioniq from was in a dispute with Genesis last fall. Their request for G70s was held hostage until the dealer agreed to certain terms with the mfr.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The separation of Genesis was certainly botched, but the Genesis “roadmap” (listing future models in development) was only released in May of 2016.

      The 1st of 3 Genesis CUVs (not counting the BEV CUV) is set to launch in Korea late this year or at the latest early 2020.

      3.5 years is pretty reasonable to see something go from the drawing board to the dealer lot, esp. when a new platform and powertrains are part of the process/equation (the GV80 concept was only revealed April of 2017).

  • avatar
    TimK

    Model X MSRP is $140K. Genesis has quite a bit of room to lever one of their designs into this market segment.

  • avatar
    Inside Looking Out

    Not so fast, they have to wait. Right now Tesla is busy fending off nasty and formidable German Tesla-killers. German killing machine is legendary and Koreans are nowhere close. After Tesla done with Aryans then it will be Hyundai’s turn to get itself killed.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    One can say whatever you want about Tesla, but they, more than any other car manufacturer has tapped into the “I want to drive the future” market than anyone.

    I remember staring in wonder at concept cars at the New York Auto show in 1968 alongside Craig Breedlove’s Spirit of America with its 600.61 mph record. Decade after decade, the revolution never happened.

    Tesla is the only game in town for those of us who want to live in the future. Yes, it’s irrational. But it is real, nonetheless. Simply electrifying existing models won’t reach this market. Alongside the various Tesla models, everything converted from existing models and platforms seems old.

  • avatar
    akear

    Tesla is a cult like Apple computer. People are not just buying a car, but a way of life. Like Steve Jobs once did Musk captivates his audience, and they follow him like a Zen leader. This probably explains why electric cars sold by GM and Ford fail miserably while Tesla thrives. This Genesis will sell no more than a few thousand a year and then disappear like the CT6-EV did in record time last year. I just hope GM does not cause itself severe financial damage by having its dealer lots flooded with unsold electric vehicles. I think we all know this scenario is inevitable. The truth is that only companies that can sell electric cars effectively are Tesla and some European car makers.


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