By on June 25, 2019

A report surfaced today from , suggesting that the Camaro will not live on to see a seventh generation. Having been sold continuously for the last 10 years, the iconic pony car is not planned to transition to the new A2XX platform. Current product plans forecast production to 2023, but nothing further.

The current sixth-generation Camaro is built on the Alpha platform that was utilized by the outgoing ATC and CTS. The new CT4 and CT5 models are built on an updated version of that platform, dubbed A2XX. While all 3 models will be built alongside each other at the Lansing Grand River Assembly Plant, the Camaro is not slated to receive a redesign to transition onto the newer chassis.

Development of a seventh-generation Camaro was under way but is reported to have been suspended indefinitely. Unless there is a revival of the program, the nameplate would fade away after 2023.

This would not be the first time that the Camaro has been put on hiatus. The last gap in production lasted from 2002 until the fifth-generation car made its comeback in 2009. The sixth-generation car made a leap forward in performance and refinement, continuing on to become a monstrous performer, especially when in 1LE guise.

The ZL1 1LE challenges the performance of the Corvette line, which may be a contributing factor to what’s put the Camaro’s future in jeopardy. The Pontiac Fiero was rumored to have suffered a similar fate for the nearly identical reasons.

Other factors, such as declining sales, mixed response to styling, changing personnel, and the brutal performance potential conflicting with GM brand images could be at play. Justification for investing in developing a seventh-generation Camaro on the A2XX platform will be played against the weakly-projected sales volumes providing a worthwhile return on investment.

As far as the Camaro has come, it would be a shame to let the car die off. Hopefully this is not signaling an end to this golden era of performance cars.

When asked for comment on the future of the Camaro, a GM spokesperson responded, “While we will not engage in speculation, we will remind you of our recently announced updates coming to the Camaro lineup this fall. An all-new LT1 model will provide customers V8 power with the design and affordability of our LT trim. The award-winning SS model will feature a new front fascia from the Camaro Shock concept. All of our updates are customer-driven to improve the car and its driving experience.”

 

[Images: General Motors]

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132 Comments on “Camaro Rumored to be Put Out to Pasture After 2023...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    FWIW, it is possible the Camaro will die and be replaced by a more liveable Chevelle/Monte Carlo/whatever.
    However, there might not be enough pricing or volume daylight to add a triplet to the Cadillac cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Robotdawn

      I wonder if this is the case. There is usually just enough truth to most rumors to be true but still make sense. Say GM can’t make a Camaro on the Alpha platform you can see out of with a V8, so they decide to drop the V8. Or CAFE is going to kill the V8 whether you can see or not.

      Well, a Camaro without even the option of a V8 isn’t a Camaro in my world, and in most everyone else’s too. So, an Alpha Coupe/sedan for Chevrolet you can see out of with no V8 could be rebranded as Chevelle or Monte Carlo and at least in marketers eyes, it would be OK.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        That actually makes sense. It would be much wiser for GM to drop the Camaro altogether then to not offer a Camaro with a V8

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Lie,

          See Commodore, Blazer, trailblazer, Envision, entire Cadillac brand for examples of how Mary isn’t afraid to destroy entire brands let along name plates for a quick buck.

          At one point the Commodore was the F150 of Aus, now it’s a joke, possibly the most egregious example.

          • 0 avatar
            Robotdawn

            I don’t get the hate over the Blazer name re-use. It didn’t even exist for all that long the first time. And it isn’t like everyone else hasn’t done the same thing. Jeep Cherokee (!), Toyota Highlander, Nissan Pathfinder, Ford Explorer. There are probably a dozen other nameplates that used to be BOF and are now unibody. Big deal.
            RWD Commodore was going away one way or the other. Use the name or don’t, two bad answers.
            Envision is a joke, but I hope it’s perceived by GM as a failure, sales lag severely behind other mid-sizers.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            @Robotdawn

            The Blazer name existed for 25 years (1969-1994), being renamed Tahoe for 1995.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Blazer name was used for a long time, not to mention the S-Blazer which still had off-road chops and capability. The new Blazer is an egregious dumpster fire of crap.

            If GM wanted another minivan and had to use the blazer name they should have at least made it RWD and offered a V8, instead we got a cesspool with an awful design and worse drivetrain to match.

            The Commodore should have been retired, turning it into some crap front drive 4 cylinder shouldn’t have even been considered. No one wants front drive and 4 cylinders when they buy a car. The Commodore went from aspirational to the butt of a joke in a single generation change. Horrible idea. It’s like Ford replacing the F-150 with a Ridgeline.

    • 0 avatar
      56BelAire

      How could they make a Chevelle and a Malibu that are two different cars?

      • 0 avatar
        nels2727

        GM has the right fun to drive, powerful, dynamic, but still somewhat practical car for the Alpha platform; it’s the outgoing CTS V-Sport. The CTS V-Sport is basically what an Oldsmobile used to be. It’s the banker’s hot rod but it doesn’t need to be; it can be trimmed as a Chevy and it would fix the Camaro’s glaring weaknesses and still provide 80-90% of the performance. There’s no reason it can’t be offered with an LT1 instead of the turbo 6 as well. Who cares what they call it a car with the V-Sport’s specs for V8 Camaro money would sell the Kia Stinger is proving that right now.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Brash Muscle cars don’t fit in with their new home country of China. And Americans have this odd desire to see out of there cars.
    Whoever said the Camaro was supposed to take the Corvettes place should see this. Mary is turning her quintessential American company into a Volvo level bit player that only sells Chinese and Mexican vehicles, we can already tell the Colorado and new Silverado are 3rd world designs.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I would say GM has about 2 years before they suspend Australian importing operations all together, Silverado has already lost #2 spot, Corvette is being turned into a rich mans bit player, and Chinese crap is in every car they’re rolling out now. I don’t think this ship can be turned around now.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “Brash Muscle cars don’t fit in with their new home country of China.”

      Neither do heavy duty pickups, Suburbans, or Escalades, and yet GM continues to make a s**t ton of them.

      If the Camaro dies, it’s because it’s getting its’ lunch eaten in the marketplace by Mustangs and Challengers, which are better cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Suburban seem to be going minivan next generation from leaks coming out so that fits right on in. Heavy duty trucks look like they were designed in China or Thailand, so again American styling is missing and they remain only to be the cash cow they have been.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I don’t doubt the other two are better cars, but GM knew in 2011 that visibility was an issue and then brought out a car on an even smaller platform, with worse visibility and a higher price. This is 100% GMs fault and completely avoidable.

          The SS Camaro is a good commuter at $25k after discounts, it’s a horrible car at $36k. No reason for the 4 or frankly the 6 to even exist.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Challenger is tied to LX, and although I’ve argued LX lives until at least 2025 (if only as fleet) I doubt the Challenger lasts as long.

        Perusing the Wiki, I see MY16-18 of Alpha Camaro has met with decreased sales every year since the Zeta was discontinued (MY15). Bottom line is Alpha sucks and its bringing the models down with it.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Camaro

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          The problem isn’t the platform – the Camaro’s execution on that platform is what sucks here. The lack of visibility would be a no-sale for me.

          (Worth noting: the ATS coupe is built on the same platform, and it’s far easier to see out of.)

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree on the lack of visibility, which is a self induced problem. However the platform has been lackluster in every model it was offered in.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I’ve been saying this since the start, the Alpha was built based off of a computer model creating the perfect chassis dynamics, The rest of the platform is a rolling disaster of an after thought.

          The Zeta should have carried on with a new design, my SS sedan has nice large windows that come down low enough to rest your arm on, how did they screw up the Camaro so bad?

          The ATS is further proof the Alpha platform is awful, such a tiny unlivable interior.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The interior volume of the ATS coupe would have been fine for the “Pony Car” class. Being super roomy was never a Camaro/Firebird hallmark. Ford has the right idea with the current Mustang, but GM went full-on Lotus Exige with the Alpha Camaro.

            I like the SS Sedan but if that’s the sort of thing you’re looking for then you don’t really want a Camaro in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’m looking for between Mustang and Challenger which is reasonable for a pony car.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Hummer hasn’t driven a Alpha platform flat out. It is chiseled from ingot!

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Chicks and pencilnecks don’t understand muscle cars (or pony cars). They love cheaply made but very expensive beige crossovers though.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    With the Corvette going mid-engine, and the expected price jump that goes with that, I must ask…What The [expletive deleted]? Yes, the interior is Playskool quality and you need a periscope to look out, but cheap, RWD speed? YES! Once again the Mustang wins by default mainly because we’ll probably still have the same Challenger on the same platform in 2023.
    I see a lot of new Camaros around here, even with that new face that isn’t the most attractive. So, someone’s buying them. And I just wonder who the hell is running the Titanic into the iceberg over at GM because they REALLY want another repeat of 2008 when the market went to hell, tastes changed, and GM was caught asleep at the wheel. It all can’t be crossovers and pickups for an entire lineup.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Agreed – this makes NO sense, which I guess is typical of GM. I just assumed that if anything the Camaro would add more models and move up market to fill the gap created by the mid engine C8. While we still don’t know enough about the C8 a price hike and less storage are pretty much givens. Glad I got a C7 now but thankfully given how the Corvette market works there will be plenty of used but rarely driven C7s will be available for YEARS to come.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Yup, GM is _comically_ self-destructive.

  • avatar
    FerrariLaFerrariFace

    “MOAR SUVZZZZZ!!!!” – M. Barra

  • avatar
    jack4x

    What could possibly make more sense than getting rid of the most affordable way to get GM’s best engine?

  • avatar
    dusterdude

    Based on its current sales, I’m surprised it will even be produced until 2023..

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      It’s GMs fault the sales are low to begin with, you can’t see out of the thing, it’s cramped like a Miata, and the V8 should have started around $28k not a ridiculous $36k.

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        They also absolutely ruined the looks, then they added a 4-pot engine which brings the whole car model down.

        They haven’t added any interesting USP:s to the car either. Would it hurt to use a few of your hundreds of engineers’ ideas and have your idiotic bean-counters sit down for just a short while? Would it kill you to build up _brand value_ for the long-term instead of short-sighted cost cutting every single day of every single decade?

      • 0 avatar
        rpol35

        “It’s GMs fault the sales are low to begin with, you can’t see out of the thing, it’s cramped …”

        You are right, that’s one of the reasons the ancient Challenger is outselling it, it’s not cramped. This is the same myopia that Chevrolet had with the 2002 Camaro, “There’s no market for it, so let’s discontinue it.” There was plenty of market for a pony car then, just not the turd that Chevrolet was building. Everyone else is always wrong, never them.

        It’s an absurd cartoon of a car (yes, a great performing one); change it up for crying out loud.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        V8 for 28k, what are you smoking?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Ford has some V8 Mustangs priced with discounts on dealer lots around $29k.

          How is $28k remotely crazy? It’s likely no more expensive to produce than a turbo 4, if not cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Sales are down, but not horrendous. They’re on track to move 50k Camaros this year.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        Peak 70’s sales of Camaro and Firebird was around 400k per year mostly fueled by Boomers, equal to today’s popular CUV’s.
        At 50k per year I could see them keeping it around as a near halo car.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Mustang is down, too, but is still tracking at 60k+ for 2019. When Ford killed its sedans, they made it clear that the Mustang would live on.

        Challenger will be near 60k this year, too.

        I’m a bit surprised GM would walk away from the Camaro business. It outsells several other whole brands in the US.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    As I recall, they said that about the sixth generation as well. They’ll make it disappear for a year or so and then it will come back again, probably looking like a knock-off of the ’80s or ’90s version… maybe even in BEV form.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Whoa there….you saying that in the near future 6 years I can get a brand new IROC-Z with T-Tops, rear louvres and possibly the new LT1 under the hood?

      Um, I think I might need to start saving up for a new car.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I’m saying they could repeat what they did back in 2003-2006 which saw the Camaro go from a sleek and very slippery aerodynamic coupe to the retro-’69 look which has morphed slightly but still retains that first-gen styling in the current model. The next version could pick up with something more along the lines of the ’80s or even ’90s look and maybe even gain a true liftback rear window again, as well as seeing the aerodynamic benefits that saw the old 3.8L V6 achieve 33mpg on the open highway while still offering reasonable performance and decent visibility all around (I said ‘decent’, not ‘great.’)

        Make it an electric and it could even exceed the mpge of the Tesla Model 3 while giving better driving dynamics.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          “go from a sleek and very slippery aerodynamic coupe to the retro-’69 look which has morphed slightly but still retains that first-gen styling in the current model.”

          The funny thing is if you peruse some of the Camaro forums there are nutswingers (or I guess less insultingly dyed in the wool enthusiasts) that consider the 6th gen sleek and futuristic with a nod to the past and outright call the current Mustang a retro machine like the Challenger.

          Although I do agree GM needs to dump the overall 1st gen styling and maybe look at the 2nd and 3rd gen cars if this all turns out to be water cooler talk and little else.

          They also need to focus less on the nutswingers when they do the focus groups. I’ve variously read GM relied heavily on input from the fans and that is most certainly a disaster since the true fans of the car are willing to accept whatever compromises team Camaro was willing to make to get the performance car fans wanted in the style they wanted.

          By comparison Ford seeking an international audience was willing to fire the diehards that wanted a 1965 fastback Mustang in perpetuity. Most of them bitched about how it no longer looked like a muscle car and looked like “euro trash” (which was the original intent anyway in building a light sporty coupe with a hefty dose of European inspired styling). Most of these cats grumbled about going to FCA and getting their muscle car fix with the Challenger and Camaro but I see they obviously didn’t leave en masse for either competitor or if they did that shows how fringe they were since whatever impact they had was swallowed up by the larger overall market.

          I’ve also read this is a sour grape story being pushed by a disgruntled editor or some such writing click-bait but with the emergency refresh (shades of 4th gen Firebird) and Al Oppenheiser being moved to the EV program at GM apparently M Barra’s desire to see an all EV future it lends the 2nd Camaro hiatus a decent amount of credibility.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @raph: First thing they need to do is kill the focus groups–they’re a big reason why GM is doing so badly, especially now. GM made it big by doing its own thing and ignoring the so-called focus groups. Among other things, they built some of the most beautiful cars in the world–iconic in nature and still remembered fondly today. Now they build some of the most hideous vehicles–the only good looking ones visibly based on a once-foreign model, like the current Colorado mid-sized truck (looks nothing like its Silverado-look-alike from the previous generation).

            @nrd515: I owned a ’96 Camaro with the 3.8L V6 under the hood. Yes, I know, a mere 200 horses (about 205 after I replaced the air filter.) I put over 160,000 miles on that car and it was remarkably quick–co-workers asking me what V8 I had in her. More, I averaged 28mpg in my daily 120-mile round-trip commute and over 32mpg on the open highway doing 70mph. For a now 23-year-old model, it got better economy than the newer version with a turbo-4 under the hood, albeit by only 1mpg better. Their 6 cylinder doesn’t even mention a fuel economy rating on Chevy’s website. Considering the differences in engines, wouldn’t it make sense that the new engines should exceed the economy of a nearly 20-year-old model?

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          Only problem with the present and last gen’s “first Gen” styling is it doesn’t look anything like it. If it actually did, they would be selling better.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        IF they make an Iroc-Z or anything close, I’m interested. IF they make it look good, and the present car is the perfect example of how NOT to do that, I’m interested. If it has room for me to be comfortable, I’m interested. If it has a trunk I can use, even if it’s smallish, I’m interested. If it has a NA V8, ~400 HP and all the above, I’m sold. If the Camaro wasn’t so damn ugly, I’d be driving one now.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      I think Vulpine nailed it. It didn’t make sense to me to get rid of the iconic Camaro name. They’re not. They’re just hitting the pause button while they retool it into something a little different.

      I hope it’s not an SUV.

      • 0 avatar
        WildcatMatt

        Agreed. I doubt it’s going away for good, it’s just going to skip a year to cleanse the palette.

        Letting people think it’s going to go away though may help goose sales a little bit in the meantime.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Why won’t I buy a Camaro??? I can’t see out of it. It’s too expensive. I am now too old, fat and arthritic to bend myself into it.
    Why won’t young people buy a Camaro?? It’s too expensive what with cost of living and school loans. They can’t see out of it. Cars no longer have a “cool” factor. Big doors don’t do well in urban parking spots.
    Why won’t 40 somethings buy a Camaro?? They can’t fit their kids into it. They can’t see out of it. It won’t fit into their budget. They are no longer “Transformer” fans.
    GM has reached the point of having 0 vehicles that interest me, and apparently, others feel the same.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “Why won’t I buy a Camaro??? I can’t see out of it. It’s too expensive. I am now too old, fat and arthritic to bend myself into it.”

      I howled when I read that. Being in MY mid seventies I can afford to buy just about any vehicle I put my mind to.

      Trouble is, with most vehicles my body is not willing to cooperate.

      If I ever buy another vehicle, it would have to be a four-door Tundra. It’s the best single all-around vehicle to own, for me.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        highdesertcat

        I think you have just gotten used to entering vehicles butt first, and exiting butt last. Try putting 1 foot in before sitting down when entering. When exiting try standing up with 1 foot in and 1 foot out.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        highdesertcat

        I think you have just gotten used to entering vehicles butt first, and exiting butt last. Try putting 1 foot in before sitting down when entering. When exiting try standing up with 1 foot in and 1 foot out.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Peter Gazis, if I could, I would. I make all sorts of old-man noises getting in and out of vehicles these days.

          THE PAIN! THE PAIN!

          Of course it does not help that I gained 65 pounds since I quit working at the end of 2015.

          • 0 avatar
            Charliej

            High desert cat, I am in my mid seventies too. My vehicle is a sixteen year old Escape. It is a good enough vehicle but I only drive it about a hundred miles per month. Most of my getting around is on my motorcycle. Riding a motorcycle is the best way to keep in shape. In the past few years I have gradually lost forty five pounds. No diet or anything, just eating good food instead of fast food.Down here in the mountains of Mexico it is hard to not be healthy. Anyway, riding a motorcycle will keep you in good shape. It does not have to be a big motorcycle either. My bike is a 110 cc Yamaha that is light and tossable.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Charliej: “Most of my getting around is on my motorcycle. Riding a motorcycle is the best way to keep in shape. In the past few years I have gradually lost forty five pounds. No diet or anything, just eating good food instead of fast food.Down here in the mountains of Mexico it is hard to not be healthy.”

            — At least you have a safe place to ride (relatively speaking, that is.) Where I live, I’d be afraid to even get on a bike without risking being hit by some careless driver–even on tertiary roads, much less the open highway or city streets. About the only times I see bikes around here is on weekends, when anywhere from 6 to 50 bikers are riding together or a very few on sport bikes out-racing those careless drivers. Even then, it seems there’s a bike crash almost every week in my county–usually fatal.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Charliej, I have developed an inner-ear balance problem that prevents me from riding bikes full-time. At one time some time ago the only thing that was keeping me upright was the centrifugal force of the motorcycle (BMW R100RT) wheels, when I got a dizzy spell.

            But a few months ago, I did buy a new Honda CRF450L in El Paso, TX, to put on the hitch carrier of our Motorhome, in case we broke down somewhere. Like a Lifeboat.

            Since then, I blew the 440 Hemi in the Motorhome and we are using the 2011 Tundra I sold to my son back in 2016.

            I’m not looking to buy anything at the moment since we have my daughter’s 2013 Odyssey to drive as well because she is on a 6-week Caribbean cruise with her (married) man-friend (with benefits).

            And we’ll be going to Ensenada again for an extended stay, sometime.

            So maybe in the Fall, if we decide to stay Stateside for any length of time, or travel within the CONUS and Canada. My sister wants us to come stay with them in Vancouver BC again, and my other sister in Israel has asked we come stay with them as well.

            We’ll see what develops over time.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        HDC wouldn’t know that with modern propulsion is driving Toyota’s. With speed you wont need to see but out the windshield when passing. Punch it than change lanes.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          NormSV650, I am a RoadRider and a Retread. My annual haunts at one time did include Sturgis and the Aspencade at Ruidoso, NM, along with Monterrey and Carmel CA, a long time ago.

          I just can’t see my self riding a Trike or 3-wheeler these days, to keep from falling over.

          But this is not the forum for such discussion.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          Reliability is the ultimate luxury in “modern propulsion.” That is why the Japanese crushed GM.

    • 0 avatar
      Raevoxx

      @gasser, I was about to type a comment about why *I* didn’t consider a Camaro when I was car shopping, you and a few other commenters hit every point.

      So there’s not much else to say other than, as much as I hate GM, I DID actually-factually shop for a Camaro, and a few years back, I even cross-shopped a Cruze hatchback before I bought my Elantra sedan. I’m not afraid of playing a game of Devil’s Advocate.

      It’s probably worth noting, that I have about 24 hours of seat time driving pre-production V6 Camaros. The visibility is awful, and the vertical dash arrangement is… strange. Otherwise, I DID enjoy driving it quite a bit. Thus, it isn’t like I’ve never driven the car.

      This will die a typical GM death, and probably be resurrected in 2033.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      The answer is to:

      A) Live in a temperate climate zone

      B) Get the convertible which has has full top operation from the remote

      C) Not drive in the rain

      Granted, that makes for a pretty small slice of the resulting Venn Diagram, but it does address most of the issues ad maximizes the cars good points.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        I sat in the convertible at the auto show and somehow it still felt claustrophobic

        • 0 avatar
          rpol35

          With the roof down?

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Yes it was weird, I also saw my dad sit in it (5,10) and adjust the seat to his height… at which point the front seat literally touched the back seat. I’m 6’2” btw. I believe it was because of the proximity of the windshield end to my face.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Agree with you, Hummer. I think it’s because windshields are so “fast” these days. At an auto show, I sat in a Cascada with its top down, and as I got in I had the sense that I was going to hit my chin or poke my eye on the corner of the windshield. It sounds irrational, I know, but that’s how I felt.

            With a modern non-covertible, the low roof forces you to swing your head under as you get in. That’s not pleasant either, but it’s not as unsettling as I found the Cascada.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Exactly, the windshield is simply not in a good spot, this could be corrected if we were given windshield without such extreme pitch.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Over the weekend I sat in a Hyundai Veloster and a Infiniti G35 coupe. Both were tight for my 6’2” 210lb self. The Veloster was fish in a bowl claustrophobic.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      The best solution to being old is to have climbing as a hobby when you are younger. Or just take some time to think about those movements you do many times a day, just about every day, and be more intelligent and efficient about them.

      I’m 100% sure that just about everyone can take away most of the strain just by placing your limbs better, taking better placed handholds, etc. The physical strength needed to get into a car is not great, and climbers know how much you can either reduce or increase the effort needed just by using your head and/or trying out different techniques.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      Young people usually don’t think their parent’s generation’s cool is their generation’s cool. They may think their grand parent’s generation’s cool is, but this Camaro is not their grand parents’ generation’s Camaro.

    • 0 avatar
      jumpinjamster

      @Charliej I’m a little confused. How does riding a motorcycle keep you in shape?

      • 0 avatar
        Charliej

        The reason it helps to keep me in shape is that I live in a small town in the mountains of Mexico. The speed limit on streets in town is twelve miles an hour. The streets are cobblestone and very rough. Some of the streets are very steep on the mountain side. Riding here is a workout. As I am in my mid seventies any workout helps to keep me in shape. I do walk a mile or more most days too. Walking helps my legs stay strong but the riding is an upper body workout. Anyway, I have been riding for fifty nine years now and I don’t intend to stop.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Hopefully they revive the 3rd gen… for no other reason than my entertainment; the only car I’d buy in this segment is the V8 Rustang.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    Brash muscle cars from an arrogant company, for a demographic that could care less, isn’t a good combination. This is a first clue that that Reuss will be on his way out soon, and following that will be his whole lineage of the “old boys club.” It has been my theory that Mark Reuss was the driving force for the performance end of GM, for good or ill. Usually ill. “Performance end of GM” means pushing all the excessive quantities of overpriced models that suck the money out of GM, money that could be better spent elsewhere, or returned to stakeholders. All the models that may perform well, but just don’t make sense in a under-thinking, over-reacting, quick to bail, company like GM. Models like Corvette, Camaro, and the V-Series Cadillacs, for starters. All models with high promises and iron-clad business plans from GM Marketing, but met with a public that says ‘meh.’ Lease queens, depreciation kings.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      As weak as the performance offerings may be, the rest of GM ia rolling dumpster fire. The remaining car the Malibu is the worst thing this side of the new millennium, the crossovers universally look awful and are weak, I don’t even need to touch the trucks.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors, LLC (our Leyland Motors – failed, forced bail out by taxpayers ward of state) – where an infinite amount of stupidity and ignorance mixes with an infinite amount of arrogance and narcissism that results in executive total compensation the likes of which Barra, Reuss, Ammann, Carlisle, etc etc etc receive.

    Guangzhou- Guadalajara Motors, LLC, a parasitic tapeworm upon the taxpayers.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    It doesn’t make much sense to kill the Camaro but to keep producing the Cadillacs. I see multiple Camaros every day, but can go weeks without seeing an ATS/CTS. Not saying my personal observations necessarily match the data, but keeping the Cadillacs only makes sense if you’re selling them in China. Which they won’t, because the local joint venture will be building them over there.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    GM sensed they were falling behind Ford in terms of their model line. Or, “lack of models” line. Better hurry up and cancel some more cars so Ford doesn’t get an advantage!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    It will be back in 2025 as a four-door hybrid-electric SUV with AWD. It will come in brown, manual, go 0 to 60 in 3.0 seconds, have a range of 560 miles, a top speed of 241 MPH, pull 1.32 Gs with just Goodyear Assurance tires on the 16″ rims, 6-piston carbon fiber brakes that defy the laws of physics for rotor size versus rim size, seat 7 in total comfort, pull a 10,000 pound trailer, come with a mind linked Infotainment system that is 100% flawless, 32 speakers, all leather interior hand stitched with children’s tears to exotic raw zebrawood. It will come with a 10 year, 200,000 mile warranty, not require any fluid changes, EVER, will be painted in the unique color of your choice, and the cost will be $9,999 before the $2,000 rebate.

    The best and brightest will still complain because the cup holder is in the wrong place and you can’t buy one “new” CPO. Bastards.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      You should send your resume to Elon Musk. Tesla may have an open slot in their marketing/blame-shifting department.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      No, way the GM geniuses will axe that at the last minute (after incurring all the development costs) if the bean counters say that they can save 5 cents per vehicle by instead giving the Malibu an ugly facelift.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      GM has done a lot more wrong than right since the 1970s. They have made some good cars and have also shoveled a lot of sht at their customers, especially compared to their Japanese competition. They drove themselves into bankruptcy. The taxpayers lent them a bunch of money and also gave their union 20 billion dollars, which has never been paid back. They have thrown in with a totalitarian regime and enemy of the US in an effort to cut costs. Precious few of their vehicles are examples of excellence or market-leadership, despite endless hype.

      A certain cynicism should not be surprising.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    In other news Ford was delighted at the news saying, “GM’s lack of a Camaro goes perfectly with our lack of a Sedan”

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    GM and Ford agree: If it doesn’t sell 100,000 units per year, with a minimum $10,000-per-unit profit margin, we’re not interested in producing it.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      People’s Exhibit A

      E2XX based LaCrosse hit the ceiling at about $51K. Errrr merr Gerd! Too expensive.

      OK, dead, instead…

      P2XX based Blazer (shorter version of E2XX) hits the ceiling at about — $51K.

      Oooooooo…V6 CUV.

      Same engine, transmission, AWD system, heck half the damn switch gear is from the LaCrosse and so is the instrument cluster.

      Suckers.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        So, the Blazer is really a Buick?… They’re doomed

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          The AWD system in the Lacrosse is the same in the Traverse and Acadia. The P2XX platform is used on a TON of CUVs that GM offers. The Lacrosse was the first vehicle moved to E2XX in 2017, the Impala was supposed to follow in 2020, and the Lacrosse was getting a refresh in 2020. The XTS was slated for execution.

          Come 2017 there was very little in common between the Impala and XTS vs the Lacrosse. Engine, tranmsission, AWD system, platform were all different.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    The Alpha…probably conceived early as a Pontiac-branded Audi/BMW wannabe, to move Pontiac up-market. Recall the G8. This would be made in USA and cost less.

    Bankruptcy. GM forced to ditch Pontiac. A lot of work already done on platform, so they finished it out as a junior Cadillac 3-series competitor.

    In all fairness, they did a decent job–some hits, some misses.

    But, as is typical GM practice, car was overpriced. So it was not a big sales success. I don’t know what GM was looking for sales wise, but to me, ATS was a disappointment.

    It’s not a cheap platform–the highly touted handling costs some coin.

    Building the Camaro off the Alpha platform helped make the factory less inefficient. But the Alpha is not cheap.

    Also, the ‘original’ 2010 Camaro was a hit because it was novel-kinda like the ‘new Beetle’. By the time the Alpha Camaro came along, it was a little stale.

    The Alpha Camaro did accomplish the impossible–even less visibility.

    Great handling car, lots of rave reviews, but sales so-so. Not an easy car to live with.

    If GM kills the Camaro, will the Cadillacs be far behind? Camaro sales aren’t what they used to be, but a lot more than the Cadillac.

    GM may think the new ATS/CTS (whatever they call them) will be big hits–they probably do, but I don’t. The Camaro still sells.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      ATS was not built to replace the VE platform. VF platform was in development (evolution of VE admittedly) while Alpha was under development. Alpha was always planned as a Cadillac platform to start and to trickle down (which was the GM way pre-BK).

      The three sins of the ATS out of the gate:

      2.5L NA 4-banger
      Torture chamber for a back seat
      Low rent interior appointments in critical areas

      To point 3, you can put hard touch plastics in low touch/low visible areas, but that instrument cluster was eggregious and stared you in the face every second you drove.

      The platform itself is brilliant when mated to the right engine/tranny.

      Remember the 2009 Camaro was built on the VE platform.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Not only was the Camaro getting stale by the time the Alpha arrived, GM defended the decision by saying that customers wanted more of the same styling. Remember when the Camaro looked radically different with each generation?

      GM doesn’t have those kind of guts anymore.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Was the Alpha planned as a Cadillac pre-bankruptcy? It’s possible.

    I agree 100% with the first three sins.

    1. The 2.5 liter Malibu/automatic was completely inappropriate.
    2. The back seat….deficient, but the car drove well, so maybe that could slide.
    3. The instrument cluster… I agree with you 120%…but most people seem OK with it.

    The MSRP for the above–WAY too high at around $35k.

    The car should’ve been priced at $32,900, with the turbo 4, and $35,900 with the V6. That price might have been low enough to entice budget conscious or open minded 3-series or A4 drivers (the intended audience). After driving the car, they might have liked it enough to buy or lease. Pricing it at parity with a 3-series was a huge mistake.

    It’s a moot point now.

  • avatar
    dwford

    This is a surprise. With the new Corvette going mid engine, it surely will see a massive price spike (because there’s no way GM will sell a mid engine supercar for $60k). That would seem to leave a huge hole in the lineup and plenty of room for a full range of Camaro’s. Is the idea that we will get our GM performance from a variety of Cadillac 4 door V cars? I don’t see how that would satisfy the typical Camaro buyer. Mustang wins again, I guess.

  • avatar
    honda1

    It will be replaced by a chicom built chevette.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Most of the customers for Camaros, Mustangs, and Challengers are aging Baby Boomers just like Harleys. There will always be those who want pony and muscle cars but many of them are aging. I wouldn’t be too hard on GM for eventually discontinuing the Camaro because FCA and Ford might eventually do the same thing with the Challenger and Mustang. Pickups and crossovers are the big sellers. There are other things to criticise GM for like the botched job that GM did on the new Silverado which is too important a product for GM’s bottom line.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Buyers do not want to spend top-dollar on GM products because they do not see the quality and reliability that they perceive in competing products.That is entirely GM’s fault. They have sold a massive amount of half-baked garbage over the decades. That is why the Japanese ate their lunch.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    Bad News Trolls

    GM Authority reports the Camaro isn’t dead. Only delayed.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I just read that article.

      “Delayed until further notice” doesn’t exactly spell confidence, this IS GM we are talking about here.
      The Blazer was delayed until further notice as well, you can see what a dumpster fire that turned out to be, it’s not even an SUV any longer.

      Besides they could always just bring a 2 dr GTO over to serve in its place like last time… oh wait…

    • 0 avatar

      They replied to my request for comment and didn’t turn down the suggestion that the Camaro has no plans after 2023.

  • avatar
    Rocket

    Fear not car fans … if the Camaro gets the axe, we’ll still have the “Camaro-inspired” Blazer to satisfy our performance needs.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I guess this also means that the Chevrolet brand will be free of manual transmissions in the US for the first time ever.

  • avatar
    Dr.Nick

    Why didn’t they build a retro, clean Gen 2 Camaro instead of continuing with the Tank slit retromobile they designed the first time?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    After a while people lose interest in GM products. That can be said for Ford as well. Both GM and Ford are in a race to the bottom. I see a golden parachute in the future of both GM and Ford executives and a future sale of both.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    Who cares about the Camaro? Did you know that the Traverse has THREE ROW SEATING?!

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      The Camaro means a hell of a lot more to me than a bloomin’ Traverse, I can tell you that. Even two-row seating is more than I need, 99% of the time.

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        Except for one single time, the only riders in the back seat of my Challenger were my two dogs, who seemed to be ok back there. All I wanted out of a Camaro was for it to look good, have a trunk just a little bigger than it had(I actually need the trunk), and redo the interior. But the main issue is just to make it look good. The opposite of the last 3 gens, actually.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Could they build the Camaro in the ‘Nam and sell it at a lower price point?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    That is something that never occurred to me have a retro 60’s Camaro built in Vietnam and call it the Hanoi Special.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    GM is killing of the Camaro instead of spending money to improve it. With better interior and visibility the Camaro will be an awesome car but then there will be no reason to buy the more expensive Cadillac version of this platform.

  • avatar
    80Cadillac

    Perhaps it’s finally time for the GM80? They weren’t suitable as replacements for the F-body, but at least could have sold decently against the Probe (also conceived as a pony car replacement). They still look rather futuristic to my eye. I’m not fond of the retro themes and impracticalities of the current Camaro, Mustang, and Challenger. Someone at GM should rediscover the future.

    http://www.curbsideclassic.com/automotive-histories/automotive-histories-the-gm-80-camarofirebird-f-body-almost-becomes-fwd-body/

  • avatar

    Barra has basically castrated GM’s performance cars. It is even sadder what has happened to Cadillac.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    See the upcoming LT1 model actually had me liking the Camaro again for the first time in a long time.

    A super cheap monstrous V8 will do that.


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