By on June 7, 2019

Friday brought a third day of talks aimed at preventing a U.S.-imposed tariff on Mexican goods. Late last month, the White House warned that a 5 percent import levy would hit Mexican goods on June 10th, rising to 10 percent by July and 25 percent by October, if Mexico doesn’t stem the flow of illegal migrants travelling through its country to reach the U.S.

Going into the weekend, the threat still stands. There are, however, signs of progress both from the U.S. and its southern neighbor.

You wouldn’t know it from comments by White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, who said Friday, “Our position is still the same and we’re moving forward with the tariffs” on Friday, as reported by.

Sanders added that meetings between the two sides have gone well, but not well enough to head off Monday’s tariffs. A legal notification of the tariffs is expected today.

Speaking to reporters in Mexico City, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador put on his optimistic face, saying, “There is dialogue and an agreement can be reached. I’m optimistic we can achieve that.”

On Thursday, Mexico deployed police and military forces to its border with Guatemala, hoping to harden its southern flank against the flow of Central American migrants. As reported by the , Vice President Mike Pence said he was “encouraged” by Thursday’s talks, but added that the final decision would be Trump’s.

Today, Trump to suggest, among other things, that Mexico might avoid the looming tariff by purchasing U.S. agricultural products.

“If we are able to make the deal with Mexico, & there is a good chance that we will, they will begin purchasing Farm & Agricultural products at very high levels, starting immediately,” Trump tweeted. “If we are unable to make the deal, Mexico will begin paying Tariffs at the 5% level on Monday!”

Any tariff levied on Mexican goods would be a nightmare scenario for domestic and foreign automakers, raising sticker prices on vehicles sold in the world’s second-largest auto market. Automakers are already contending with a slumping Western car market, increasingly stringent emissions regulations, a pricey plunge into electric vehicle development, and faltering Chinese sales. Interesting times.

[Image: General Motors]

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32 Comments on “As Mexico Beefs Up Its Border, Tariffs Still Lurk on Monday...”


  • avatar
    johnnyz

    Mexico blinked. They cannot continue to let all of these immigrants flood in from other countries. I believe it is international law that dictates that you can seek asylum in the next country, not hop over Mexico into the United States and then seek asylum.

    It seems that Mexico is going to start enforcing their own border and not letting these caravans pass through.

    This is a victory for Trump and the United States.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    It is nice to see a president who is sincerely committed to reducing illegal immigration. Most US citizens agree with this goal. Most US politicians are full of sht on this issue.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The family separation policy was indecent and immoral to the degree where toddlers were representing themselves in court.

      We’re still cleaning up the mess.

      This is not good to see.

      Just send the migrants to my town (we’re a sanctuary city), and the other towns like us. We thrive on immigration.

      • 0 avatar
        hreardon

        Luke42 –

        I agree – family separation is a bad thing. It’s also been an issue that pre-dates Trump, simply because by law you cannot put minors in the same detention facility with adults.

        While I have sympathy for those trying to create a better life in the United States, unfettered access to our country is a bad idea. There’s a reason most every other country on the planet has rules and limits for immigration.

        • 0 avatar
          markf

          I notice folks who weep and virtual signal over “family separation” (but only when the President has an R after his name) don’t seemed to concerned for all the families separated by Prison (should we allow kids to serve prison time with their parents?) or families separated by military deployments.

          This is mass migration not normal immigration. This is the just the Dems trying to import a new constituency that will forever change Texas and Arizona and ultimately America itself.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Correct, its the planned balkanization of this nation after a Soviet Union style economic collapse.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        When the idea of doing as you describe and sending them to sanctuary cities was discussed, the leaders of those cities we’re far less enthusiastic.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        Put up a wall and families can stay together in Mexico. When you break the law and get arrested, you tend to get separated from your family, at least you do if you are a US citizen. It’s called jail.

        “Family separation” is an issue brought up in the hope that people will substitute emotion for reason. This is a typical tactic of people who don’t want to discuss the real issue, which in this case is massive illegal immigration. Don’t enter the country illegally and your family is your own problem, not one you have dumped on American taxpayers by violating federal law.

        And please don’t start on those phony “asylum” claims taught to illegals by leftist activists. What a joke.

        Sanctuary cities? Fine. 2nd Amendment sanctuary cities are a thing. As long as the law is irrelevant when you don’t agree with it, then it’s all good.

  • avatar
    gomez

    “Mexico will begin paying Tariffs at the 5% level on Monday”

    Once again, the president demonstrates that he has no idea how tariffs work. The country targeted doesn’t pay them, the American consumer does.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      This tariff is already working. Mexico is going to stop trafficking illegal voters for the NGOs. Did you read the article before regurgitating your globalist talking point?

      Once again Trump has proven that he’s both more intelligent and principled than his detractors.

      • 0 avatar
        gomez

        None of what you just said has anything to do with how tariffs actually work. Try again. Nothing globalist about facts.

        • 0 avatar
          dwford

          Yes, the citizens of the country that imposes the tariff actually pay the tariff in the form of higher prices. Mexico wouldn’t want its exports the US to become permanently more expensive, as corporations might move production out of Mexico.

          I wish Trump would do all of this less publicly. He’d get more of what he wants if it didn’t mean the public humiliation of the other political leader.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Do you mean like Chucky Schumer publicly trying to undermine our President in this negotiation?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            How much more will consumers pay before it breaks their backs? Will they switch to a cheaper equivalent? Or decide their old car or flat screen isn’t so bad? Or opt for “used”?

            Manufactures cannot pass on all their operating expenses to their customers. Of course consumers always have the last word.

            Since tariffs are based on MSRP or suggested retail, manufacturers might actually lower their prices, especially if rebates would normally be applied anyway.

            Manufacturers should be impacted before anyone else, and they’re mostly the focus of tariffs. Besides, importing their products should place them at a huge advantage over their USA Made competition, so they should be able to eat the tariffs without a problem.

            If not, why are they carrying poor margin products or lines anyway?

        • 0 avatar
          notinuse

          Don’t bother gomez, data doesn’t matter.

      • 0 avatar
        Ce he sin

        Alternative take: Trump has had a backlash from American industry concerned that its costs are going to rise. A form of words is agreed between both sides so that Trump can tell his supporters that he has got concessions and the Mexicans can tell theirs that they haven’t rolled over for Trump. Everyone’s happy, until the next time.

        • 0 avatar
          Urlik

          Sounds like the last 4 administrations Cen he sin. A deal at all cost for positive optics. Didn’t vote for the Cheeto but he’s winning me over despite his antics.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Same. Except the is often great and it is necessary in order to break through the mass media hate.

  • avatar
    JD-Shifty

    wow, another episode of Fox and Friends

  • avatar

    Mexico should not budge to US bullying. If they do who will then vote for Democrats?

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      A little over half of the American electorate votes for Democrats. We’re Americans, not Mexicans (who have their own elections to vote in).

      Personally, I was raised as a small-business conservative — but was kicked out of the party in the early 2000s for insufficient bloodlust. Colin Powell’s speech to the UN was weaksauce that they used to justify sending my friends to war. I failed to be entheusiastic about this, and so was told I was “a liberal” — so I joined the liberals.

      I’m still for free trade and open markets just like I was as a kid — which makes me a Democrat in 2019. That used to be a conservative position.

      I also don’t believe that m the government should regulate who I marry or what I smoke, which also makes me a Democrat these days. Small government used to be a conservative position, too.

      Republicans have embraced an anti-intellectual race-to-the-bottom mentality, which is very much personified by Trump. Republicans used have data and rational discourse to convince people like me of their views — but that hasn’t been true in 20 years, which is why academia now skews toward the Democrats.

      There is much much more, of course, but these are the points which are easy to talk about.

      People like me vote for Democrats.

      I’m quite familiar with both the R and D arguments. The D arguments are simply better. But, the average responses to my comment will, as always, be a politicized version of “shut up, NERD!”. [shrug]

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        “Colin Powell’s speech to the UN was weaksauce that they used to justify sending my friends to war. I failed to be entheusiastic about this, and so was told I was “a liberal” — so I joined the liberals.”

        It’s funny, I went to those wars…3 times. Over 2 1/2 years downrange I’ll never get back. Funny thing is it was Obama who sent me on each occasion. I’ll give him a pass on the first one because it was 2009 and he really seemed to be ending it. Then I went back a couple of times and I’ll be darned if I could figure out what we were doing there.

        My point is, that while I’m no friend of the Richard B. Cheneys of the world, never underestimate the bloodlust of the guy that followed. We were engaged in more places in 2017 when he left than 2009 when he came on the job.

        At least when a guy with an (R) following his name kicks off a war you get a robust protest movement. I remember code pink and campus “die ins” and what not. By the time I left to go and it was my friends getting killed…nothing.

        As such, I hold the US antiwar movement in the same esteem I do our esteemed former Vice President Mr. Cheney…they use the wars to obtain political goals and care not about those in the fight who they claim to support.

        • 0 avatar
          markf

          “At least when a guy with an (R) following his name kicks off a war you get a robust protest movement”

          Yup, cause as we both know it’s not really an “anti-war” movement, just the same old leftists throwing a temper tantrums cause their guy lost…….

        • 0 avatar

          Yeah Art, but Obama was awarded the 2009 Nobel Peace Prize for “extraordinary efforts to strengthen international diplomacy and cooperation between people”. You see he waged Peace. He was a Peacenik. If we had a president, that did just what he said,
          the country would be just alright, and no one would be dead.

      • 0 avatar
        markf

        “and so was told I was “a liberal” — so I joined the liberals.” Translation: “I was never a conservative and have no ability to think for myself”

  • avatar
    Mach 1

    What you will not see on Sean Hannity show.
    Truth, facts, intelligence

    What you will not see from 45.
    CLASS, intelligence, facts ,truth, maturity, morality, manners,modesty, his money, diplomacy, respect for law and his office, 239lb

    Drain the swamp, his gang of goons have mostly been fired or in jail, heyyy, LOCK HIM UP !

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Luke42–Agree, the same with me. I was raised in a Republican family and my Congressional Representative at one time was George H Bush. It was during George W’s administration that the Republican Party said that all those who don’t agree with all of the Party’s positions should leave, so I left. Our father’s Republican Party was fiscally conservative and less interested in interfering with individuals personal life choices. I would like to see a viable 3rd party that represents middle America.

    I am glad to hear that the tariff war with Mexico has for now been resolved–hopefully no more drama.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    It’s interesting that immediately following this article is a T-Mobile ad completely in Spanish. Guess they didn’t realize what country their ad would appear in.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    I understand Tariffs and frankly as they have been proposed, I’m ok with paying them. The illegals aren’t free either. Stop the influx, Do something about the ones here to make them legal (no, it isn’t right but as a nation we have to own that our policies over several decades are at leas partially to blame for them being here). Then bring them out of the shadows, let them pay taxes, and afford them all the rights and protections afforded American workers rather than keeping them down as a virtual slave class so people proclaiming to care can by .49 cent heads of lettuce.

    Capitalism doesn’t work when you create an artificial floor on costs. Stuff costs what it costs.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Also, I have never seen a breakdown on what items would be mostly effected. With respect to cars the manufacturerers that assemble alot of cars down there its easy to figure. GM and FCA seem the most exposed. But take a Subaru and a Ford though (Ford would likely kill the last of their production as it is all slated to die anyway). But I’m sure they all bolt something into their vehicles that is made in Mexico…probably many somethings. How would that effect pricing. I’m inclined to think not much (certainly not 5 percent of the purchase price).

    And those Tariffs would get spread out across the entire line. And you could build them in the US as others seem to be able to do profitably. In the case of GM we are talking at least a couple of high margin vehicles. You mean to tell me GM has to have that cheap labor to make money on the Silverado? I seriously doubt Ford is losing money on the F series, all of which are built in the USA (Dearborn/Louisville). That was just greed on GMs part.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    It’s just a negotiation.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Manufacturing parts in Mexico is nothing new. My 99 S-10 has door handles, glove box latch, and several other parts Made in Mexico and it likely has Chinese parts as well. Auto makers have been outsourcing many of their parts outside of the US for years.


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