By on April 2, 2019

2020 Ford Escape

Ford unveiled the all-new 2020 Escape in dramatic fashion by turning the fabulous Henry Ford Museum’s Greenfield Village into “Escapeville.” The automaker seated members of the media on bleachers, but in a moment of trickery, it turned out said bleachers were mobile (insert Jim Hackett “mobility” joke here), and as they moved rearward, the Escape moved out from under sheets (Ed. note — This sentence has been changed to provide clarification. The original wording incorrectly implied that the Escape drove out from under the bleachers). Quite the effort, but it shows how important the Escape is, especially to Ford’s sedan-free future.

Initial press reaction to the Escape’s frontal appearance was, “huh … unexpectedly nice.” Following the moving bleacher introduction was a trip down a fictitious “Main St., USA,” with groups of actors playing out scenes of 2019 Americana, doing things that Americans do. Playing basketball. Unloading suitcases. Dancing, singing, and playing instruments. A man in camo returning home from war, presumably, with a dog that was being fed many treats to comply with his military master’s directions.

As we passed over an intersection, the first car left and three more entered our field of view.  The whole town joined in celebration around the new Escapes as the music ended.

As we sat in the middle of a transformed Greenfield Village, I couldn’t help but wonder … is Ford trying to convey that the new Escape might be to today’s market what the Model T was to America a century ago?

That might not be far from the truth, at least in Ford’s lineup. The Escape has moved to a new front-wheel drive platform that also underpins the European Focus. In doing so, the model’s design has clearly made a move toward that of a car/hatchback/station wagon. The stance looks wider, with bumper and rocker heights appearing closer to the ground. Viewed from front and side, the Escape’s styling is conservative yet handsome; not trying to make a statement.

The roofline leads into a significantly sloped rear hatch. Had a single Ford employee used the word “coupe” in the product descriptions, I’d have walked right out. Thankfully, they didn’t. But the rear end of the car is much busier than the rest. It looks like the wind tunnel determined the design, leaving it nondescript and a bit awkward. Look at the protruding, wraparound black lower bumper, then try to unsee it.

All in all, the design is appealing, if pedestrian. There’s little to distinguish it as a Ford, save for the outline of the front grille. If someone slapped a Kia badge on the front and drove it past me, I’d likely assume it was a Niro.

That said, I feel this is the design direction that SUV-crazed buyers prefer. Everyone thinks they want an SUV, but what they really want is a slightly higher seating position (compared to a sedan) and the flexibility of a hatchback. Welcome to the tall-hatchback-with-available-AWD 2020 Model T segment. Was the Dodge Caliber the right car at the wrong time?

2020 Ford Escape

Inside the new Escape, the news isn’t 100 percent good. While certainly an upgrade over the outgoing model, the improvements are mostly in terms of cargo and seating flexibility. The second-row seat slides 6 inches fore/aft to exchange leg room for cargo space, while both front and rear seat positions have more head and shoulder room than the outgoing car. Up front, the gearshift has been changed to a rotary shifter, opening up space on the console.

The dash- and door-panel material selections appeared far too rubber-like, while the wood-look trim appeared to be light-brown plastic with dark-brown strakes brushed across its surface.

The seats and steering wheel felt comfortable and well-positioned, while the instrument cluster has an available 12.3-inch all-digital display, with no physical gauges at all. There’s an available 6-inch head-up display screen ahead of the driver, while the center infotainment unit is an 8-inch capacitive touchscreen with Ford’s Sync 3 infotainment system. That touchscreen works much like your cellphone, meaning there are no secondary controls. The base unit is a 4.3-inch non-touchscreen that apparently does have physical controls.

2020 Ford Escape

Cue my rant about how tablet-style infotainment systems are a scourge upon interior automotive design and cue my other rant on how touchscreens shouldn’t be the primary method of control in a car where you’re moving and bouncing around. I feel that they’re too far away to control accurately, you spend too much time correcting your fat-fingered missed inputs, and they smudge. I’m sure there are studies to prove me wrong, but until I see them, that’s my stance.

On-board 4G LTE Wi-Fi, wireless charging, and up to four USB ports – with two of them being USB-C, will be available. Only one of each of the USB ports will be available immediately at launch, though.

The new Escape is powered by any of four powertrain options. Buyers can choose from two gas options, a hybrid, and a plug-in hybrid. The base engine is a new 1.5-liter EcoBoost turbo three-cylinder that’s expected to make 180 horsepower and 177 lb-ft of torque. The upgraded gas engine is a 2.0-liter EcoBoost four-cylinder, expected to make 250 hp and 275 lb-ft of torque. Both will pair with a new eight-speed automatic transmission. Towing capabilities are 1,500 and 3,500 lbs, respectively.

Perhaps the biggest news here is that the new Escape has dropped more than 200 pounds from its predecessor, at least in base FWD trim. A new FWD S model tips the scales at a relatively svelte 3,299 lbs. Sure, some of that loss comes from chopping a cylinder off, but there’s a fair bit of aluminum use in components like the hood, suspension control arms, mini-spare, and in the bumper beams, as well as use of several variants of high-strength steel in the body structure. By my quick fact check, that would make it lightest in its class, at least for the base FWD model.

 

The hybrid options both use a 2.5-liter Atkinson cycle four-cylinder and an electronic continuously variable (e-CVT) transmission. The standard hybrid has a small briefcase-sized, liquid-cooled 1.1 kW-hr lithium-ion battery stored under the right rear passenger floor. The combined power is an expected 198 hp, and the hybrid is expected to provide a 550-mile driving range for the FWD variant. It is also available with AWD.

The plug-in hybrid will use a much larger 14.4 kW-hr battery that spans the rear passenger floorboard and prevents the fitting of a driveshaft. Therefore, the plug-in hybrid is FWD only. It is estimated to have 209 combined hp and an electric-only range of 30 miles. The neat trick here is that Ford offers four EV modes that allow drivers to decide how they want to use the battery’s energy. EV Auto, EV Now, EV Later, and a new EV Charge Mode are available, depending on the environment the driver is in and where they’re headed.

Selectable Drive modes refine the ESC, AWD (if equipped), transmission, engine, and EPS (electric power steering) calibration for the task at hand. Normal, Eco, Sport, Slippery, and Snow/Sand are the available options. I was assured that these were all available on the FWD version, as well.

The move to the new FWD Flexible Architecture and the decision to go in a more car-like direction throws a bit of a softball to the vehicle dynamics team, since numbers like a 200 lb weight reduction, a 10mm lower roof height, 20mm wider track, and 20 mm longer wheelbase mean they had a much-improved platform to work with. With 17-, 18-, and 19-inch tire options across four powertrains, there was surely plenty of tuning to work through, though. Two significant changes include an isolated rear cradle and electric power steering.

 

Electronic power steering was a critical addition to the car in order to support all the advanced driver aids that come on the new Escape. Ford’s Co-Pilot 360 comes standard on every 2020 Escape. This includes blind spot Information system w/ cross traffic alert, lane-keeping system, auto high-beams, and pre-collision assist w/ automatic emergency braking and pedestrian detection. Additional technology offered includes Active Park Assist 2.0, evasive steering assist, and adaptive cruise control with Stop-and-Go and lane centering.

The next Escape offers the expected content, hybrid models, and the usual suite of driver’s aids. With the benefits of expected leaps in driving dynamics, NVH, and fuel economy, will buyers appreciate the more car-like direction of the 2020 Escape and make it Ford’s modern-day Model T? While Ford certainly hopes so, it also has a backup plan in the form of an upcoming new “Small Rugged Utility” vehicle built off the same platform.

We’ll have to stay tuned for that one.

[Images © 2019 Anthony Magagnoli/TTAC]

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121 Comments on “Revealed: 2020 Ford Escape...”


  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    I am underwhelmed.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Was the Dodge Caliber the right car at the wrong time?”

    no, because its problem wasn’t its form factor, its problem was that everything about it was awful. Horrible interior, nasty CVT, terrible NVH, awful styling, you name it.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I had one of those as rental once. That CVT needed to be destroyed with fire.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        The ultimate irony is that the jatco CVT in the Caliber/Compass/Patriot application of all things has proven to be reasonably reliable. But I agree they sound absolutely horrible. While doing undergrad research during hte summer, our USDA Explorer lost its transmission at 58k miles and they bought a few newer high-efficiency domestics to support the car makers during 2008-2009, an HHR and a Patriot with a CVT. We were all missing the Explorer for our 45 minute drives out to the field, or would snag the 6.0L Silverado 2500 if only two of us were going.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I think the concept of the Caliber was good, the execution not so much

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        Nitro better!

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        I had a rental Caliber, and the design/layout was, in theory, excellent. Too bad that the beancounters insisted on making it as cheaply as they could. Everything felt like crap because it was crap. Given a $1000 boost in material expenditures and 30% more refinement, it would have been a great vehicle. I just don’t understand why go through the exercise of design only to ruin it with poor quality materials. Instead of forging new appreciation for the brand, this was just another car that actually dragged it down – something pretty hard to do when the bar was already set really, really, low.

    • 0 avatar
      MKizzy

      It was the ugliest thing on 4 wheels at the time, especially with those oversized taillights that looked like they belonged on a Ram Van.

      Daimler must’ve really had a dim view of middle-class American car tastes to infest us with their horrible car lineup.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It’s much nicer then some of the other pics I’ve seen and it’s a continuation of Ford’s move away from sedans and towards these crossover hatchback hybrids. I liked when the Escape was more SUV-like then crossover, but I guess that will be the Bronco’s niche

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Huh? They’re turning the Escape into a Focus! Gimme back the slab sides and boxy shape! You can’t put a dog carrier in that!

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “The base engine is a new 1.5-liter EcoBoost turbo three-cylinder that’s expected to make 180 horsepower and 177 lb-ft of torque.”

    Those must be the three largest pistons ever made by the hand of man. Is this is a typo?

    “That (8-inch) touchscreen works much like your cellphone, meaning there are no secondary controls.”

    If I’m not mistaken, that’s an 8-inch touchscreen in the photo above, and I seem to see secondary controls right below it.

    Nitpicks about this writeup aside, what I think of this vehicle won’t really matter. It’ll sell. And I applaud what appears to be a lower beltline.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The thing that interests me the most is the claim, mentioned by other outlets, that the sliding rear seats, in their rear most position provide more rear leg room than a Suburban. I mean yeah the Suburan’s rear seat room sucks for how big the vehicle is but packing that much space in a vehicle several feet shorter is pretty significant.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    A total chic car. A guy would be embarrassed to be in that. The new Rav4 went in the other direction. The Rav4 was a chic char that now has masculinity. Personally, I really like the new Rav4.

  • avatar
    Snowshoeman

    Yay! Another jelly bean small SUV with a clothes washer dial to change gears.
    how uninspiring

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      I like the jellybean look, especially as done by Porsche.
      It looks to me the next Mazda3 hatch screwed up on theirlook by totally removing the larger hatch glass along with the massive c pillar.

      And, to me, the best design of the minivan other than the newest Pacifica was the Chrysler minivan jellybean look in 2009.

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Interior looks cheap and ugly. Worse than H/K.

  • avatar
    V16

    Looks like an updated, larger Ford C-MAX..

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      My thought exactly. The C-Max was a very practical and nice driving vehicle, that Ford had to heavily discount to sell, which is not what they are hoping for with the Escape, but will the market see it that way?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Here’s the thing, I was a bit disappointed at first, but then I remembered that Ford sells this in every market in the world as a Kuga and they sell a lot of them. The Kuga/Escape has a pretty good reputation worldwide and Ford wasn’t about to risk that position for market-specific styling. I get it now and good for Ford for trying to stay in business. I just hope the fun stuff comes later with the Bronco

      • 0 avatar
        bobmaxed

        I’ll be adding this vehicle to my list to replace our current C-Max.
        Still waiting to see if they come up with something to replace my FiST Not holding my breath. Neither of our current vehicles has done anything to drive us away from owning a future Ford model.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      Looks like the Ford Niro to me. I imagine they’ll still remain popular with the redesign, unlike the C-Max, which was doomed from the start with the messed up fuel economy numbers.

      I like my 2013 C-Max though, and it was cheap used because of Ford’s stupidity.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      I don’t think it’s really much larger, but I also see a great similarity to the C-Max. (Edit: I see it is 6.5″ longer and has 2.5″ longer wheelbase. That’s significant.) The plug-in version of the Escape may be worth a look. The one thing I fear is the driving experience with the new electronic power steering. I believe that the C-Max also had EPS, and it was pretty good. It didn’t feel quite as good as the Focus steering, which was some of the best in a reasonably priced car. But I think the basic hardware was the same, so the C-Max’s steering still was pretty good.

      The one feature that I find really intriguing is the sliding rear seats. That could be a big boost in utility!

      The one feature that I question is that the plug-in hybrid is FWD-only. If this proves to be a detriment to sales in northern states, couldn’t Ford put an electric motor and halfshafts on the rear and make it AWD with relatively little effort?

      • 0 avatar
        Anthony Magagnoli

        While technically possible, diverting to a rear electric motor would entail far from little effort. It was surely considered, but packaging aside, calibrating a stand-alone motor to the fwd gas engine would be an utter nightmare. Not to mention the implications to dynamics development of having one model in the lineup with such a rearward weight bias.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Aping Aston Martin is out, imitating Porsche is where it’s at now.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I didn’t notice the Porsche until you mentioned it. Yes, they did have a Porsche poster on the wall in the design studio

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I just pulled up some pictures of the current Cayenne and OMG the headlights and that whole C-pillar rear end is almost identical. Maybe I like the new Escape more then I thought, because I’ve always been a fan of the Cayenne. I have a feeling the Escape is going to look a lot different in real life compared to photos

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      nuthin wrong with this!
      heck, borrow more.
      besides, designs are much like songwriting these days, everybody copies from everybody.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    “Look at the protruding, wraparound black lower bumper, then try to unsee it.”

    I’m actually more impressed that they didn’t incorporate the rear bumper into the structure of the liftgate like so many are doing lately.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      The interesting thing about the back bumper, which looks like something tacked on to meet 5 mph bumper regulations in 1974, is that it draws attention to the front having zero protection whatsoever. Was the person who designed the back in communication with the person who designed the front? Was everyone stoned when this design was approved for production?

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    The door panels have dimples, much like the legs of the women who drive them.

  • avatar
    Steve203

    I rather like it, because, with the lower beltline, it looks more like a hatchback, than a big, boxy, trucky thing that is trying to look taller than it is. But, my sense is most people want that big, boxy, trucky thing that is trying to look taller than it is.

    One thing tho, with the tiny 3rd window behind the back doors, if that even is a window, and the blinders on the sides of the window in the tailgate, assuming the window is actually as large as the piece of glass and not partly opaque, like in a CR-V, rear quarter visibility must be truly horrid.

  • avatar
    watersketch

    Sliding rear seats are awesome.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    I don’t think I would ever be overwhelmed by this, as I dislike this type of vehicle. Tall, soft, boring, yada yada But this looks an awful lot like a Nissan Rogue to me, meaning it looks like most of the others. Yawn.

  • avatar
    JMII

    The iPad stuck on the dash thing has to die. My parents have the previous generation Escape and the touchscreen infotainment unit is integrated nicely and tucked away keeping the sun off it. I know display technology has gotten better but this iPad on the dash looks like mirror ready to reflect as much light as possible. Just because Audi did something doesn’t mean everyone should copy it.

    • 0 avatar
      watersketch

      Maybe the Ipad look makes it easy to upgrade/replace? I remember having to replace the display on a Jeep grand Cherokee and it was bear to remove.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      I agree. The old Ford interior’s screen placement was just about perfect. There was a large surface to rest your palm and steady it while you pressed an on-screen button, a large sunshade and, best of all, and OFF button for the whole dang distraction. This new screen will stand up tall, blank and smudgy after I turn it off. For every other screen-addicted (read: normal) driver, it will be standing up proud saying, “Look at me!”, not the road.

    • 0 avatar
      Anthony Magagnoli

      Preach it!

  • avatar
    Prado

    While Honda and Toyota turned the CRV and RAV4 into legitimately compelling replacements to their mid size sedans, It appears to me that Ford decided to keep the Escape in a segment below. It seems like an odd decision. I can’t imagine a Fusion/Camry/Accord/Optima etc owner trading in their rides for this. It will probably still sell well, but with the demise of the Fusion, Ford has nothing in the heart of the market.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    GM so screwed up. They should have launched the Aztek in 2020 because U-G-L-Y, built on a car platform, and eye-watering price points when fully equipped is really, really, in.

  • avatar
    Robotdawn

    What is with the “tablet on the dash” look now. Even Ford now?

    All that without-a-stereo-useless dash to cram the screen in and now they want to pop the thing on top like a tablet. I assume I must be in the minority (again), but I’ll never buy a car that looks like someone tacked an Ipad on top the dash.

    • 0 avatar
      Anthony Magagnoli

      I’m with you. My wife has a Mazda3 and I despise the tablet screen, but the rest of the car is great enough to overlook it. We previously had a Giulia. THAT is how infotainment screen integration is done!

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        If it had the central command knob like the Mazda does I would probably be more okay with it. This one doesn’t look quite as bad as the one in the EcoSport.

        The floating infotainment display just doesn’t bother me. Were you able to determine if this can be shut off like the display in Mazdas?

        • 0 avatar
          Anthony Magagnoli

          I vaguely remember something to that effect. There also appears to be a physical button in the controls below the screen that MIGHT serve that function. I can’t confirm for sure, though.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    It’s almost horrific how bad this is.

    The only two positive aspects about it is that Ford finally pulled their head out of their butt and brought the hybrid back which they stupidly canceled years ago and the LCD gauge cluster.

    I can see why they didn’t release it yesterday, it would’ve been looked at as an April fools joke

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Jellybean styling that could be a 5 year old Mazda CUV. A 3 cylinder engine. Silly knob gear changer. And lets not forget the monkey see monkey do glued to the dash ipad that is being copied by every car manufacturer and presto you have Ford latest take on the current “in” CUV blandmobile. We truly are entering a second Malaise era in the automotive world.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Note to the writer: Please get a real camera. Cars don’t photograph well with wide-angle lenses. Your front and rear-corner perspectives are very distorted, so if you only have your phone, step back and crop in later. The side view is realistic, but since you didn’t crop in, the car is too small to see details. Frankly, I have no idea how this car really looks, but you can’t afford to get too picky about styling in this over-regulated, over-styled era.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    The only redeeming factor is that it has a genuine D pillar, and not a floating black panel thing.

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    That Small Rugged Utility promise piqued my interest for 5 seconds until I remembered that it’s Ford and going to be awful. I was rather open to Fords for many years, until I met several people who bought several (not just one), each one was a disappointment, and then they swore off the brand. Then, the dissatisfaction with the civilian version of Transit Connect registered and a penny dropped. Now every time I see one of Ford offerings (except F-150), I cannot help seeing their ugliness and potential unreliability. I turned into one Ford haters who infest these august pages without actually owning a Ford. The process only took 10 years.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    To those who are sad the Focus is gone….this is your Focus. Just with a little more ground clearance.

    UK Site for Focus gallery: https://www.ford.co.uk/cars/focus/gallery (Apologies if I am not supposed to link)

    This Escape is very blah. And I rather like the current one. This seems to me to be a rather mail-in job by the looks of it. Nothing wows. This is my fear with Hackett and the mobility push… I believe they’re neglecting the vehicles that keep the lights on. But then we’re enthusiasts here.

    EDIT: Looking again, the front end is just bad. It really does look like a Focus jacked up, and the headlights and grille area are beyond boring. The ancient Fusion STILL looks fantastic up front. The Edge looks good, the new Explorer has some edginess to it, etc. This Escape could put me to sleep with the softness and odd proportion.

    Honestly, I suspect this will still sell extremely well. The key items are there, powertrain options are decent (though I personally despise 3 Cylinders, getting my fair share of VW, BMW, and Ford 3’s while living in Germany). Hybrid is a good option, though may lose out since Toyota offers their Hybrid Rav4 with AWD. But most car buyers will have no idea and not give a hoot about the weird sound and feel the engine will make, and perhaps the hybrid will have better MPG than the RAV.

    Just wish it didn’t look so…. soft? I still know buyers that wish they could get the squared-off beefier looking Escape of 2 generations back.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      It will sell well because of all it’s neutrality. Ford sells this in almost every market they had to keep it neutral or risk alienating too many customers like Toyota and Nissan have done with their best sellers

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The Fusion did look good…until they refreshed again and put in those larger foglamps for whatever reason.

      The worst is what they did to the inside—the center stack is CHEAP. Even Titanium models had the silver trim bezel that was on the left and right of the screen replaced with flat black.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Good thing Ford is bringing back the squared-off beefier-looking Baby Bronco on this platform for those people

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Somebody said

    “underwhelmed”.

    That about describes it. Any thoughts on (make/model) who will get this market segment when these don’t sell?

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    Looks kind of like a last generation Mazda updated by Kia (similar to the new not-for-US Focus) in photos. Underwhelming, but probably right for the segment. Better than the Equinox and Terrain, and similar to a Cherokee or CX5, but not as nice as a CRV. Comparison probably applies to the interior as well.

    Seeing this the idea of a Bronco-ized CUV makes sense. Proof will be comparing the combined sales of the Bronco-CUV/Escape to the single RAV4.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    “The Escape has moved to a new front-wheel drive platform that also underpins the European Focus.”

    Yep. And that’s exactly what it looks like—a lifted focus hatchback with a flimsy grill where the front bumper should be and RAV-4 tail lights. At the very least, the Escape looks a little under-styled and overpriced, like it should be competing with Tuscons instead of Tiguans.

  • avatar
    akear

    The fusion looks better. This vehicle does not know what it wants to be

    What a disgrace!!

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    I miss the Gen 1 body style. And like Gen 2, what’s up with the deep dash top on this new one? Not quite Lumina APV levels of deep, but too deep still. Somehow the Lincoln hides it better…

  • avatar
    Terry

    It’s vehicles like this and the write-ups here that make me walk out to the garage and pat my ’19 Mazda CX-5 Signature on the hatch…

    • 0 avatar
      Anthony Magagnoli

      Funny you should mention that. When I asked the dynamics supervisor what vehicles they benchmarked against, she stated that it was their own last-gen Escape, as they believed they were the leader in the class already for dynamics. I asked about the CX-5 and she replied, “we focused on the volume sellers.” I interpret that as the CX-5 is a bit more of a niche vehicle and was outside of their target window for the demographic of the Escape. Rav4 and CR-V were mentioned as reference vehicles for their tuning and development.

      • 0 avatar
        Terry

        LOL, I take that in the same way that a restaurant would be benchmarking McDonald’s burgers as a model to strive against.
        To be fair, I test-drove the last-model Escape Titanium and really liked it. I thought the power, handling, and steering were excellent. Negatives centered around the interior–the dash looked cluttered and jutted out towards the front seat occupants cutting down on available interior room.
        I always thought that when you benchmarked a product, you tried to compete against the best, the top of the class…

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    Somehow, I think the “sedan-free future” won’t be permanent. I hope not, anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Nonpremium full-size sedans might be toast. I think mid-size and compact sedans will live on like the minivan segment today. Fewer players, longer refresh cycles, and steady but unspectacular volume.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Whatever 3-letter abbreviation you want to use to refer to them, I intend to never have a trunk on any car I buy. A hatch always beats a trunk, in my mind. Once you’ve had a hatch, trunks just seem pointless and severely limited, in terms of utility and flexibility, as well as I prefer the car to end at the back window, for parking ease.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Typical comments section here. Someone designs a vehicle that’s inoffensive, doesn’t have an angry grille or a floating d pillar or 700 character lines on the side and everyone whines about it.

    Inoffensive and beige is exactly what crossover buyers want, and this’ll be successful as long as it’s priced competitively (which Ford aren’t great at). It’ll also be great at selling Baby Broncos which is its secondary purpose.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Smartass comment: Ford makes moving bleachers and they move… backward.

    Serious comment: The Now & Later thing – someone at Ford has been thinking about vehicle usage patterns and responding to customer back. Nice work.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    the real question is if the base model will have big amber turn signal lenses down in the fog lamp area.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Talk with my Ford sales guy and the top line Titanium model with everything will be around $44K! If I can get a 10% off MSRP, I will buy the new Escape!

  • avatar
    akear

    I have a feeling it won’t sell as well as the fusion. The styling is not aggressive enough.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    As a former C-Max owner, I’m interested in the plug-in hybrid.

    But there are two kinds of PHEV’s. There’s the Chevy Volt’s Voltec system, which gives you 100% power output even while running 100% on electricity. And then there’s the half-assed system used by literally everyone else to date, which does not. Example: In hybrid mode the Ford C-Max Energi does 0-60 in 7.5 seconds, but in EV mode it does 0-60 in 15 seconds.

    That’s garbage engineering. No more of that, please. Folks, just license the damn Voltec system.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Actually the Plug in Accord can do 100% in EV. I expect the Escape will have the same basic system as the current Energi vehciles. It doesn’t really make sense to have that much power in the EV mode. We’ve got a C-Max Energi and it is normally left in auto mode and the ICE kicking in due to acceleration is very rare for us.


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  • Corey Lewis, United States
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  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
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