By on February 22, 2019

Tesla Model 3, Image: Tesla

Less than a year after bestowing a coveted “Recommended” label on Tesla’s Model 3, Consumer Reports is taking is back. You can just imagine the outrage in the online Teslaverse.

Consumer Reports’ secret ownership by shadowy oil execs and General Motors notwithstanding (this is clearly false, don’t sue us), the retraction of what amounts to a “buy this, you probably won’t be sorry” label is a blow to the automaker, and CR claims it’s all Tesla’s fault.

At least Tesla can say it isn’t alone in the recommendation withdrawal camp.

The revoking is a direct result of reported quality issues that came to its attention over the past year, CR claims. While the Model 3 excelled in crash tests, predicted reliability can sink any rating. Apparently, owners made good use of the reviewer’s Annual Auto Reliability Survey.

“Tesla Model 3 owners told CR that problem areas included loose body trim and glass defects,” the nonprofit organization claims.

Anyone who spends any amount of time on Twitter or immersed in one of the many Tesla forums will notice owner complaints, usually related to fit and finish. Not surprising, many claim, given the rush to ramp up production of the compact electric sedan — not to mention the facility’s improvised assembly line, which came together under a tent in mere days.

Unlike in past years, Tesla CEO made no mention of the slight on social media, spending Thursday tweeting about SpaceX rockets instead. The company’s shares closed down 4 percent following the CR report.

Musk can find solace in the fact that five other models also had their recommendations stripped. Based on consumer back, CR is no longer giving its nod of approval to the Chrysler 300, Dodge Charger, Acura RDX, BMW 5 Series, and Volkswagen Tiguan.

Good news awaited BMW, Genesis, and Lincoln in the report, as CR returned the recommended label to the X3, G90, and Nautilus (formerly MKX).

[Image: Tesla]

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83 Comments on “Consumer Reports Is All Out of Love for the Tesla Model 3...”


  • avatar
    jatz

    It appears kool aid can spoil.

  • avatar
    TimK

    CR is applying old-fashioned criteria and methodology in these rankings. Tesla customers are truly different, and the ratings system needs to take those differences into account. When you close your eyes and imagine a Tesla 3, it’s a wonderful car. Buy one, sight unseen, sans test drive, again in the mind’s eye it is perfect. Then imagine the adoration/envy of fellow virtue-signalers— it’s a slam-dunk deal!

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I think C/R likened the Model 3 to a Corvette – very high customer satisfaction, lower than average quality.

      I suppose if you were forced to pick such dichotomous results, you’d choose to have high customer satisfaction, and the Model 3 is the highest one around.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Speaking of virtue-signaling, it takes many forms. Wouldn’t you say that coal-rollers are signaling their own brand of “virtue?” Or you you call it something else.

      Personally, I drove a hybrid that almost nobody would recognize, or even look twice at. Nobody knows but me, and that’s fine. I do it because it’s the right thing to do, and cheaper, too.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    Making sure the parts of the car you make, ya know, REMAIN ATTACHED TO THE CAR has been a pretty low bar for auto manufacturers to clear for some time now. This is Tesla’s first high-volume effort; some issues are expected. As long as they’re ironed out, it’s fine.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I’ve heard the poor paint quality attributed to CA regulations on paint formulations. Seems plausible.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      That’s possible, but I’ve seen reports that the paint is about 1/2 the thickness of “normal” which would confirm that they are pushing cars through the paint shop faster than it was designed for. Also large areas inside the “frunk” and door hinge areas that aren’t being painted body color, only primer.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      Are you referring to water-based paints? I think all manufacturers are using them now. According to people who, you know, actually paint cars the water-based paints are at least as good as the old, solvent-based formulations, but you have to use the correct equipment–larger nozzles on the guns, for instance–and procedures. And, the requirements are EPA mandates, not California specific:

      “Automotive paint is paint used on automobiles for both protection and decoration purposes.[1][2] Water-based acrylic polyurethane enamel paint is currently the most widely used paint for reasons including reducing paint’s environmental impact.”

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automotive_paint

      Your misinformed attempted slam on California is duly noted.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        carguy67, Actually this theory is sound. CA has more stringent rules on paint and lacquers. When we remodeled our kitchen, we hired a local cabinet guy as the price was equivalent to what Home Depot was asking. He told us that CA has indeed clamped down on what paints and lacquers can be used and the rules are different here than in other states. It’s another reason why (other than cost) that a lot of cabinetry mfg has moved overseas with environmental rules getting blown off.

        It’s not a slam. It’s a fact. The link you cited was a wikipedia page on auto paints, not on what paints or processes Tesla is using.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          …He told us that CA has indeed clamped down on what paints and lacquers can be used and the rules are different here than in other states…

          Ever been near lacquer painting of cabinets, etc? The smell from the solvents is unbearable. The VOC levels must be sky high. As for cars, water based finishes have been around for many years. If the solvent (water) was really the root cause, all cars painted with it would suffer the same. There no doubt were some early problems, but even there was it the actual paint or corner cutting on prep by the beancounters?

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “Your misinformed attempted slam on California is duly noted.”

        I said, “I heard…”

        And I said, “seems plausible.”

        Hardly coming from a position of certainty. Your poor reading comprehension is duly noted.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      @MasterBaiter:

      Not so much. The Model3 has been suffering from scratches, dirt trapped under the clear coat, “orange peel” finish and poor panel fits. None of these have anything to do with CA regulations.

      These are more symptoms of being assembled in a tent in a hurry by overworked staff.

      The videos that Engineering Explained and Redline Review did explain the common defects well.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Haha is anyone reallybsurprised that a company that releases beta level self driving software that crashes cars into fire trucks and builds cars in a circus tent that have the bumper fall off in the rain is ranked so low?

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Elon tweet storm in 3.. 2.. Here’s hoping he doesn’t call CR’s staff pedos..

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    This is one of several reasons for why I passed on the Model 3. Even the one in the showroom had crooked door trim.

    The build quality on my Ioniq EV is perfect so far.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Huh, how is it living with the Ioniq compared to the Leaf you owned? Seat comfort, noise, that type of thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      I just hope that they make a “sporty” ‘r’ version of the IONIQ and call it IRONIQ.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      There’s already a small aftermarket springing up of companies that are customizing the interiors (alcantera) and repainting. One even offers an alternative front end for the 3.

      I remember as a kid looking at Corvette C3s at I think Les Stanford Chevrolet in Dearborn. One of the dealer options on one car was a repaint and you could tell the difference.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    A Tesla is to its owner what new clothes were to an emperor. And most Tesla owners probably read that sentence and concluded that I just called them emperors.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    It has been interesting to observe in the media, and in comments here, how these cars are so tightly associated with Elon Musk. Other than Henry Ford in the 1920, and perhaps Tucker in the late 40s, how a mass produced product is so tightly associated with its company Executive. For TESLA it has been a very mixed blessing. In retrospect, it seems the company should have been called Musk Motors, as this is how it is perceived.

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Well, there was only Benz & Cie. run by Benz, Alfa Romeo run by Romeo, Fiat run by Agnelli, Porsche run by Porsche, Chrysler (and Dodge, Plymouth, DeSoto, he was also famous for running Buick for an astronomical salary etc.) run by Chrysler, Dodge run by the Dodge brothers, Renault run by the Renaults, Citroën run by Citroën, Peugeot run by Peugeot, Toyota run by Toyoda, Honda run by Honda, BMW run by Herbert Quandt, Renault-Nissan run by Ghosn, etc. etc. etc. etc.

      So a few more cars than you think have been tightly associated with its company executive. And that’s just cars, not other ‘mass produced products’ of which there are many many more.

      And no, I do not count Musk to rank among the aforementioned greats.

      • 0 avatar
        R Henry

        Regrets I did not make my point strong enough for you to understand.

        With Tesla products, and all issue regarding the company, the public, analysts, and media immediately hold Elon Musk, the one man, as responsible for that particular issue, regardless of how substantial or insubstantial it may be. As in: It is Elon Musk’s fault the “panel gaps on the Model 3 are so wide…he is assembling them in a circus tent!”

        It is rare the Akio Toyota is publically held responsible if a Corolla rusts out prematurely or won’t start on a cold morning. I have never seen Carlos Gshon held liable for the ugly tailight design on the Sentra. Herbert Quandt is not blamed for the Bangle Butt, Bangle is.

        • 0 avatar
          sckid213

          I think Elon basically asked for it. And wanted it. He’s an attention whore who lacks self-control. He is his own worst enemy, and as a result of his actions deserves it when people blame their bumper falling off directly on Elon.

          FWIW I see Mary Barra’s name in the comments of almost every GM-related article here, never in a positive way.

        • 0 avatar
          Lockstops

          If you micromanage a company, basically decide everything and hire people to do only and exactly what you say then yes, everything really is your fault.

    • 0 avatar
      Inside Looking Out

      Tesla is the new Ford – Ford of the new era of environmentally responsible driving. Just like Ford Tesla disrupted the industry and put it on its head. Now even VW is ready to go broke just to catch up with Tesla.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    It has been interesting to observe in the media, and in comments here, how these cars are so tightly associated with Elon Musk. Other than Henry Ford in the 1920s, and perhaps Preston Tucker in the late 40s, how a mass produced product is so tightly associated with its company Executive. For TESLA it has been a very mixed blessing. In retrospect, it seems the company should have been called Musk Motors, as this is how it is perceived, and most people don’t know who Tesla was anyway…

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      https://apnews.com/4ddfb049d6984f5196fbe2267a486b43

      At least Tesla’s are still being built for their following, even if not recommended by CR.

      No such luck for lovers of ye ol’ Volt.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    It has been interesting to observe in the media, and in comments here, how these cars are so tightly associated with Elon Musk. Other than Henry Ford in the 1920s, and perhaps Preston Tucker in the late 40s, how a mass produced product is so tightly associated with its company Executive. For TESLA it has been a very mixed blessing. In retrospect, it seems the company should have been called Musk Motors, as this is how it is perceived, and most people don’t know who Tesla was anyway…

  • avatar
    saturnotaku

    I’m more surprised by CR stripping the Recommended label from the Acura RDX. I haven’t kept up, but is the redesigned model suffering from quality and/or reliability issues?

    • 0 avatar
      sckid213

      I’m curious about this as well. If Acuras cease being reliable, they are truly doomed.

    • 0 avatar
      Richard Chen

      CR.org isn’t showing specifics for the RDX other than predicted reliability is now listed as below average (2/5) with a ding for engine minor (engine computer, belts/pulleys, engine mounts) getting 4/5. That BTW a low score for a brand new car, but given that it’s in its first year not surprising.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Acurazine has all the info you need on the 2019 RDX. Plenty of reading in the “Problems and Fixes” section. Bring your own popcorn.

        Not sure you guys wait for CR or J.D. Power to receive data and regurgitate it back out, when you can go to the vehicles respected forums and see what owners are saying.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “Consumer Reports Is All Out of Love for the Tesla Model 3”
    — BULL!

    CR still has it near the middle of its reliability list AND has it listed higher than Ford, Chevy, Chrysler and numerous other brands, including European and Japanese.

    • 0 avatar
      conundrum

      Either CR dropped the model 3 from its previously recommended status to just one of the pack, or it didn’t.

      Perhaps you would be so kind as to let me know what your “opinion” is, because the facts are clear, not BULL.

      Good Lord, man. Get a grip.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    This is the second Tesla vehicle panned – the Model X has been declared one of the 10 worst vehicles. I think that Consumer Reports should not have recommended the Model 3 in the first place – there needs to be a length of time before anything can be said about reliability. Not mentioned here are the electrical problems, specifically the touchscreen failures, which disables the entire car. Just sloppy engineering to have a single point of failure.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    It may be fast and great to drive but, personally, I think there’s nothing worse than poor fit and finish. And all the rattles and squeaks would be deafening without any engine noise to drown them out. No thanks.

  • avatar
    Null Set

    For what it’s worth, every Tesla 3 owner I know is *deliriously* happy with the ownership experience. And many of them have had one for a while now. They just didn’t park them for the first time in their driveway. I can’t explain the discrepancy, but Tesla is doing something very right. Tesla owners seem to be to be more like Apple customers in their fervor for the brand. They see their Tesla as a gadget, not a car, and so their expectations are in fact very, very different. Apple products have always had huge reliability and safety problems (e.g., spontaneously combusting), yet that has never dimmed the enthusiasm of its customers.Tesla same. CR is behind the times here.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      No, CR acknowledges that Model 3 customers are the happiest on earth. They’re also saying the car has quality problems. This aligns with your illustration.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      My last 3 phones have been IPhones, despite that I’m far and removed from being an apple fanatic. Rather I don’t feel like wasting my life with a complicated setup or learning new features. Since the basic functionality of the IPhone has changed very little from my first 4S, I don’t mind replacing it with another. All cars essentially have the same functionality so that argument doesnt work with cars.

      Outside of my 4Runner, old Frontier, and IH Scouts essentially everything else I’ve ever had is GM. GM no longer makes a single product (maybe C7) that I would spend my money on.

      Tesla owners are the old BMW owners, they buy a car based on an image and a badge regardless of the products actual merits.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        ” Rather I don’t feel like wasting my life with a complicated setup or learning new features”

        If you keep upgrading the iOS in your iPhone you should have noticed plenty of new, improved, better than ever features. I’m running iOS 12.1.4 (16D57) on both my wife’s iPhone and my iPad Air. And there are plenty of new features since iOS 7.

        Ironically, we also own a Samsung S6, and frankly, the Samsung is the better phone, uses the much more popular Android OS that has more users worldwide, and a lot less drama if you choose to open an account to get Apps. With Android you don’t have to give near as much personal info, or a credit card, like you do with Apple.

        • 0 avatar
          Lockstops

          What the hell, you’re actually saying that your information isn’t safe with Apple but it is with Android??? Is this opposite day???

          There is a reason why many auto manufacturing corporations refuse to sell their cars with Android auto and claim that their customers’ info is not safe with that system. But they have no problem selling Apple CarPlay.

          Holy hell Android is Google’s product, the company that basically ONLY makes money by selling your data!! A huge proportion of Android phones are manufactured by Chinese companies, and it has been uncovered that they send users’ private data to China!!

          I’m very sceptical, and I am very careful when it comes to security (I’ve had pretty good education on that front). And I have high trust in Apple. Pretty much zero on Google’s products, and I’m certain that Chinese phone manufacturers can’t be trusted, I’m a bit unsure about South Korean ones too. I hate the fact that I have to use several Google’s products because I know that they aggressively try to pry out every little bit of information from me.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Naw, Lockstops, you misread what we were talking about. We were talking about “complicated setup or learning new features”.

            IOW, ease of use, not security of the data, which is bad on any and all of the popular platforms currently in use.

            My family owns both the iPhone and the S6 and the S6 with its Android OS is the better phone, has a much better camera, etc etc etc etc etc.

            The list is long but it all boils down to personal preference.

            Some people choose iPhone because it is a bling thing, projects the image of M-O-N-E-Y and sophistication even though the Samsung phones have fewer OS glitches, better cameras, cost less, have a wider global user base, and on and on and on.

            Your biases don’t make any sense to me because we willingly give this data to the providers and the governments have more information taken without our knowledge than we can imagine.

            When the Gov’t, the OPM, the US Military and the VA advise their employees and clients that they’ve been maliciously hacked and their data stolen, do you really think that iOS and Android, Google and Siri can add more information to what’s already out there on you?

            Wake up! Smell the coffee!

    • 0 avatar
      Lockstops

      Yeah and some people are happy to be degraded and whipped. They even pay for it.

      You must be high, saying that Apple has reliability problems! For most people I know when switching to Apple there is amazement that you don’t have to have a full-time support crew to deal with your blue screens of death every once in a while, you don’t need an engineering degree to keep it from clogging itself up and to be able to simply use it, and they work for 5 years easy while with PC you’re looking to buy a fresh one in a few years.

      I used to be in a smallish consultancy firm without an own IT support department, and the hours we spent on Microsoft crapping out on us was unbelievable. Switching to Apple was a revelation: zero issues (except for my first one being DOA, it just popped once after I plugged it in, naturally immediately replaced with another one) for 5 years and it worked like new the whole time, and I could do all my work without constant connectivity, printing, update, etc. problems. It’s still in use now as a general home machine after a few memory upgrades.

      My second Mac is now going on 4 years, and it has only needed one hard drive cleanup (just ran a program on it, no need to uninstall and install everything…)

      I got into Apple after buying an original iPad just for fun / out of curiosity, and it worked like a clock for years. Then I’ve switched from iPad to iPad with zero issues, the first one just naturally got too old and lacked storage space, second one I dropped onto a tiled floor from above my head, and the third one I’m still using (with zero issues). And for every single switch I’ve needed to just do a quick setup using my previous device’s backup. Simple as hell, and always works reliably.

      Several of my colleagues who refused to switch to Apple have experiences so far from Apple reliability it’s ridiculous. I don’t know why anyone would keep going through that, unless they really haven’t understood that it’s possible to have a positive user experience in computers…

      Anyone saying that Microsoft and Android, as well as devices that use them are anywhere near as reliable can go spew that BS somewhere else because I don’t even want to hear such utter crap. Completely ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      Inside Looking Out

      “spontaneously combusting”

      I can recall only Samsung having it not Apple.

  • avatar
    vehic1

    Sorry, old-timers; it’s going to take much more than merely relegating this Tesla to ordinary-reliability status – to kill Tesla or EVs in general. But we understand – hope springs eternal.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    So, Teslas have some quality issues (surprise!) but owners still love them. Some folks here seem to think that makes Tesla a cult.

    They’re wrong. The explanation is a lot simpler: Teslas really have no competition. If you want a cool, fast, super-high-tech, stylish EV, it’s Tesla or nothing. These cars were first to market, and they don’t have any real competitors, unless you think someone who’s in the market for a Model 3 would cross-shop a Leaf. As it stands, Teslas are the only game in town, and that’s why their owners put up with all the BS issues.

    When competition comes – as it will VERY soon, that will change. That means Tesla had better get its’ quality act together, and fast.

    • 0 avatar
      jatz

      It’s Musk’s personality and resultant behavior that cause the schadenfreude for Tesla.

      EVs will be swell for most regions of the country when they’re done by reputable companies and offer something more middle-of-the-road re performance, price and form factor.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @FreedMike: The rumors of competition for Tesla are overblown.

      VW, maybe, but nobody else is serious about producing EVs on the scale that Tesla does. The key to EV volume is battery production, and today the Gigafactory produces more battery power than any other plant in the world.

      Jaguar, Hyundai/Kia, M-B, and many others are on the stage, but when it comes down to it nobody is even close to Tesla’s commitment to EVs. And the Supercharger network is another advantage they have.

      Having said all that, I ended up getting a 124-mile Ioniq EV because I wanted a drama-free EV experience (and a cheaper one, too). Too often, Tesla doesn’t really offer that.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The imminent stuff from the VW-verse (Audi E-tron and Porsche Taycan for the moment) alone represents some pretty serious competition, if you ask me. It’ll take time for them to build their brands up in this particular market, but this much is for sure: you won’t see YouTube videos entitled “126 quality fails in my brand new E-Tron”. Quality matters to people who buy expensive cars, and once there are Tesla alternatives that truly appeal to that type of buyer, Tesla’s going to lose sales if the quality’s not there.

        To me, Teslas have a lot in common with the first Macs. They were incredibly cool when they first came out – so cool that people ignored that a lot of the software you could get for a PC simply didn’t work on a Mac, or worked worse. A Mac was more of a specialized piece of equipment, versus PCs, which did it all (just not as stylishly or easily). When PCs began to incorporate all the Mac features at a lower price, Apple came close to tapping out.

        Then again, I don’t think Tesla’s long game is to stay in business as an independent carmaker – I think they’re looking to get bought by someone else. I bet Wall Street thinks so – that’s why investors keep hanging in with the company. I think they’re looking for the big merger payday.

      • 0 avatar
        Inside Looking Out

        SCE to AUX, Tesla is luxury brand it is not for everyone, not everyone can afford Tesla. It is also signalling of wealth among other things like green credentials. So most people will buy Fords Chevys unless Tesla will come with budget brand of its own.

  • avatar
    Oreguy

    I guess I’ll be the only Model 3 owner to add to this discussion. Why not?

    I consider myself a car guy. I’ve mostly done all of my own repairs (some major) on the vehicles I’ve owned, unless covered by warranty. I’ve done my own ground-up classic-car restorations, including the paint and bodywork. I mention all of this because I don’t this or any car as a “gadget”, or an “appliance”. I don’t view myself as a yuppie, I don’t think of myself as an “emperor” (are you listening ToddAtlasF1?) and I don’t believe Tesla is a cult. Give me a break. If anything, I view my German-brand-obsessed neighbors as being associated with a cult of sorts, because I can assure you that if BMW, MB, or Audi made *actual* appliances, they would fill their kitchens with them. But each to their own.

    I’m 3 months and almost 3,000 miles into ownership. I braced myself for some major buyer’s remorse, but so far I’ve had zero. Quite the opposite in fact.

    My complaints/issues are few. First, the automatic wipers pi$$ me off every time it rains. For being such a software-rich vehicle, why can’t I increase or control the sensitivity? The blue-tooth access has been flaky for me, but I’m fairly certain it’s the crappy BT radio in my 1st-gen Pixel phone. My wife’s iPhone connects quickly and reliably every time. Several times I’ve been left standing in the rain fiddling with my phone until the car unlocks. I could just approach the vehicle with plastic key-card in hand, but I’m too lazy to do that it seems. Not Tesla’s fault.

    I don’t care much for the limited view out the rear window. The sightline is above most vehicles behind me on the road, even tall-ish CUV’s, but the Model 3 isn’t the only vehicle that suffers from this design quirk.

    I thought the central touchscreen and controls would be more of an issue. In reality, it hasn’t been. After a week it becomes pretty normal. The nav is superb. You come to appreciate the unobstructed view directly ahead.

    As for CR’s reports about body/trim issues and glass defects, frankly I’m surprised. Having washed the car by hand about a dozen times so far, I feel like I’ve thoroughly inspected every inch of the exterior. I heard all the reports regarding poor fit and finish issues, so the evening it was delivered I spent about 30 minutes inspecting it before I signed delivery papers. Who wouldn’t do that? There were no issues then, or since so far. Had there been, I would have refused delivery. You can find issues with any car if you look hard enough, or spend enough time with it. No car, or car manufacturer is perfect. To think so is being wholly unreasonable.

    Finally, the car is an absolute blast to drive. I cannot emphasize this point enough. I could write another paragraph about it, along with my overall experience owning an EV. It’s been more than good. Enough said. Maybe it’s not for everyone, but it fits me just fine. I enjoy every single minute behind the wheel. I look forward to driving it. I love our ’17 Jeep GC, but it’s boring by comparison. All I can suggest is that if you get a chance to drive one, do it. I’m guilty of being overly critical of a lot of things – especially automobiles, but truthfully unless I’ve driven one, owned one, or worked on one, I can’t claim to be an expert on the vast majority of the cars I read about on this site or any other for matter.

    Let the backlash begin, although I realize I’m a little late to the party.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d take a Model 3, no hesitation, if a) it didn’t have that silly touchscreen to control everythng, and b) if I had a place to charge it. I’d change the front end styling as well, but to each his own. Everything I have read indicates that this is a no-sh*t great car. But many Teslas I’ve seen have had some fit/finish issues – nothing earthshaking, mind you – and I’ve heard complaints about rattles.

      Don’t get me wrong – I respect Tesla for doing it their own way. I just wish they were better at building stuff, and I hope they figure it out. If not, that will cost them. Like I said – I guarantee you that no one posts a video on YouTube displaying the 112 quality issues in his Taycan.

      • 0 avatar
        Oreguy

        The front end can be polarizing, but personally I wish they would have tried harder on the rear. My co-worker bought a Model X 2+ yrs ago. It’s been largely trouble-free. When he drove my car he was shocked at how solid it felt. Much lower NVH than his Model X. I got lucky with my charging setup. The original owners of our house wired it for a sauna that was never installed. There was an untapped 50-amp breaker in the garage panel that hadn’t been wired up or even switched on in 40 years!

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “You can find issues with any car if you look hard enough, or spend enough time with it. No car, or car manufacturer is perfect. To think so is being wholly unreasonable.”

      This is where you lose me. Handwaving away a below average reliability rating in this way is a fanboy Hallmark.

      • 0 avatar
        Oreguy

        “I love our ’17 Jeep GC”

        A true statement, even considering the fact that Jeep and FCA in general got hammered by CR in their latest report:

        https://www.consumerreports.org/cars-driving/which-car-brands-make-the-best-vehicles/

        …well below Tesla. I guess that makes me a Jeep fanboy too?

        Or is fanboy in your context a term applicable only to Tesla owners or others who favor all things Apple?

    • 0 avatar
      Inside Looking Out

      Nice review Oreguy, thank you.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “I love our ’17 Jeep GC”

    Lets see if that “I’m a car guy” really is true:

    HEMI or V6?

    • 0 avatar
      Oreguy

      Yeah, you got me. Pentastar. Deduct points. Turns out I was wrong about myself all these years.

      Not to blame my wife, but the Jeep IS hers. She picked it out and wrote the check. Had I told her we need a HEMI, she would have followed my advice, but we don’t tow anything that the Pentastar won’t readily handle.

      Not totally applicable to the story, but a good friend of mine has an new-ish GC SRT. I’ve driven it, and rode in it a lot. It’s a ton of fun for short bursts, but even he admits it’s a bit tedious for daily driving.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Can someone enlighten me how the Recommended thing works? The same make and model will go from recommended to not recommended and back again from year to year. Is there really that much variation in vehicle quality from year to year, or is it a statistical quirk, or what?


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